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Court output, judicial staffing, and the demand for court services: Evidence from Slovenian courts of first instance

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  • Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina
  • Grajzl, Peter
  • Sustersic, Janez
  • Zajc, Katarina

Abstract

We contribute to the scant empirical literature on court activity by examining how judicial staffing and caseload influence court output in Slovenia, a post-socialist EU member state struggling with implementing an effective judicial system. Unlike the majority of the existing literature, we attempt to tackle endogeneity problems that arise in estimation of the determinants of court output. In addition to controlling for court fixed effects to address endogeneity due to unobserved court-level heterogeneity, an instrumental variables approach based on a plausible assumption of sequential exogeneity of our regressors allows us to address the problem of reverse causality between court output and both caseload and judicial staffing. Our findings suggest that ignoring endogeneity issues may lead to erroneous policy conclusions about the expected impact of resources, as proxied by judicial appointments, devoted to the court system. Our results imply that the primary driving force of output of Slovenian courts is the demand for their services.

Suggested Citation

  • Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina & Grajzl, Peter & Sustersic, Janez & Zajc, Katarina, 2012. "Court output, judicial staffing, and the demand for court services: Evidence from Slovenian courts of first instance," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 19-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:irlaec:v:32:y:2012:i:1:p:19-29
    DOI: 10.1016/j.irle.2011.12.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Samantha Bielen & Wim Marneffe & Peter Grajzl & Valentina Dimitrova-Grajzl, 2016. "The Duration of Judicial Deliberation: Evidence from Belgium," CESifo Working Paper Series 5947, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Libor Dusek, 2015. "The Effects of a Simpler Criminal Procedure on Criminal Case Outcomes: Evidence from Czech District-level Data," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp528, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    3. Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina & Grajzl, Peter & Slavov, Atanas & Zajc, Katarina, 2016. "Courts in a transition economy: Case disposition and the quantity–quality tradeoff in Bulgaria," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 18-38.
    4. Stefan Voigt, 2016. "Determinants of judicial efficiency: a survey," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 183-208, October.
    5. Peter Grajzl & Valentina Dimitrova-Grajzl & Katarina Zajc, 2016. "Inside post-socialist courts: the determinants of adjudicatory outcomes in Slovenian commercial disputes," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 85-115, February.
    6. Dimitrova-Grajzl, Valentina & Grajzl, Peter & Zajc, Katarina, 2014. "Understanding modes of civil case disposition: Evidence from Slovenian courts," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 924-939.
    7. repec:kap:ejlwec:v:44:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10657-016-9544-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Melcarne Alessandro & Ramello Giovanni B., 2015. "Judicial Independence, Judges’ Incentives and Efficiency," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(2), pages 149-169, July.
    9. Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay & Bryan C McCannon, 2014. "Queuing Up For Justice: Elections and Case Backlogs," Discussion Papers 14-10, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    10. Roberto Ippoliti, 2015. "La riforma della geografia giudiziaria: efficienza tecnica e domanda di giustizia," ECONOMIA PUBBLICA, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(2), pages 91-124.
    11. repec:kap:ejlwec:v:44:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10657-016-9540-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:ces:ifodic:v:12:y:2014:i:3:p:19131886 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Stefan Voigt & Nora El-Bialy, 2016. "Identifying the determinants of aggregate judicial performance: taxpayers’ money well spent?," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 283-319, April.
    14. Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay & Bryan C McCannon, 2011. "The Redistricting of Public Prosecutors' Offices," Discussion Papers 11-13, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    15. Dimitrova-Grajzl Valentina & Grajzl Peter & Zajc Katarina & Sustersic Janez, 2012. "Judicial Incentives and Performance at Lower Courts: Evidence from Slovenian Judge-Level Data," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 215-252, August.
    16. Peter Grajzl, 2014. "Behind the Courts’ Walls: Empirical Insights from Slovenia," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(3), pages 39-44, October.
    17. Falavigna, Greta & Ippoliti, Roberto & Manello, Alessandro & Ramello, Giovanni B., 2015. "Judicial productivity, delay and efficiency: A Directional Distance Function (DDF) approach," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 240(2), pages 592-601.
    18. Peter Grajzl & Katarina Zajc, 2017. "Litigation and the timing of settlement: evidence from commercial disputes," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 287-319, October.
    19. Romain Espinosa & Claudine Desrieux & Hengrui Wan, 2017. "Fewer courts, less justice? Evidence from the 2008 French reform of labor courts," Post-Print halshs-01634211, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Court output; Judicial staffing; Caseload; Endogeneity;

    JEL classification:

    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact
    • K40 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - General
    • P37 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Legal

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