IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/infome/v13y2019i1p238-254.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Peer and neighborhood effects: Citation analysis using a spatial autoregressive model and pseudo-spatial data

Author

Listed:
  • Copiello, Sergio

Abstract

Spatial analysis approaches have been long since adopted in citation studies. For instance, already in the early eighties, two works relied on input-output matrices to delve into citation transactions among journals (Noma, 1982; Price, 1981). However, the techniques meant to analyze spatial data have evolved since then, experiencing a major step change starting from the turn of the century or so. Here I aim to show that citation analysis may benefit from the development and latest improvements of spatial data analysis, primarily by borrowing the spatial autoregressive models commonly used to identify the occurrence of the so-called peer and neighborhood effects. I discuss features and potentialities of the suggested method using an Italian narrow academic sector as a test bed. The approach proves itself useful for identifying possible citation behavior and patterns. Especially, I delve into the relationships between citation frequency at author level and years of activity, references, references used by the closest peers, self-citations, number of co-authors, conference papers, and conference papers authored by the nearby researchers.

Suggested Citation

  • Copiello, Sergio, 2019. "Peer and neighborhood effects: Citation analysis using a spatial autoregressive model and pseudo-spatial data," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 238-254.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:infome:v:13:y:2019:i:1:p:238-254
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joi.2019.01.002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1751157718300488
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Natsuo Onodera & Fuyuki Yoshikane, 2015. "Factors affecting citation rates of research articles," Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 66(4), pages 739-764, April.
    2. Thelwall, Mike, 2016. "The discretised lognormal and hooked power law distributions for complete citation data: Best options for modelling and regression," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 336-346.
    3. Thelwall, Mike & Wilson, Paul, 2014. "Regression for citation data: An evaluation of different methods," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 963-971.
    4. Stephen Gibbons & Henry G. Overman, 2012. "Mostly Pointless Spatial Econometrics?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 172-191, May.
    5. Loet Leydesdorff, 2005. "Similarity measures, author cocitation analysis, and information theory," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 56(7), pages 769-772, May.
    6. Per Ahlgren & Bo Jarneving & Ronald Rousseau, 2003. "Requirements for a cocitation similarity measure, with special reference to Pearson's correlation coefficient," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 54(6), pages 550-560, April.
    7. J Rey-Rocha & M J Martín-Sempere, 2002. "Geographic information systems for science and technology indicators," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(3), pages 141-148, December.
    8. Nicolaisen, Jeppe & Frandsen, Tove Faber, 2008. "The Reference Return Ratio," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 128-135.
    9. Mueller, Julie M. & Loomis, John B., 2008. "Spatial Dependence in Hedonic Property Models: Do Different Corrections For Spatial Dependence Result in Economically Significant Differences in Estimated Implicit Prices?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 33(2), pages 1-20.
    10. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    11. Cynthia Lisée & Vincent Larivière & Éric Archambault, 2008. "Conference proceedings as a source of scientific information: A bibliometric analysis," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 59(11), pages 1776-1784, September.
    12. Wolfgang Glänzel & Henk F. Moed, 2013. "Opinion paper: thoughts and facts on bibliometric indicators," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 96(1), pages 381-394, July.
    13. Wolfgang Glänzel & Bart Thijs, 2004. "Does co-authorship inflate the share of self-citations?," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 61(3), pages 395-404, November.
    14. Bornmann, Lutz & Stefaner, Moritz & de Moya Anegón, Felix & Mutz, Rüdiger, 2014. "What is the effect of country-specific characteristics on the research performance of scientific institutions? Using multi-level statistical models to rank and map universities and research-focused in," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 581-593.
    15. Judit Bar-Ilan, 2010. "Web of Science with the Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes: the case of computer science," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 83(3), pages 809-824, June.
    16. Daniel P. McMillen, 2003. "Spatial Autocorrelation Or Model Misspecification?," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 26(2), pages 208-217, April.
    17. Roula Inglesi-Lotz & Mehmet Balcilar & Rangan Gupta, 2014. "Time-varying causality between research output and economic growth in US," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 100(1), pages 203-216, July.
    18. Stanislav Stakhovych & Tammo H.A. Bijmolt, 2009. "Specification of spatial models: A simulation study on weights matrices," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(2), pages 389-408, June.
    19. Koen Frenken & Roderik Ponds & Frank Van Oort, 2010. "The citation impact of research collaboration in science‐based industries: A spatial‐institutional analysis," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(2), pages 351-271, June.
    20. Bornmann, Lutz & Leydesdorff, Loet & Walch-Solimena, Christiane & Ettl, Christoph, 2011. "Mapping excellence in the geography of science: An approach based on Scopus data," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 537-546.
    21. Frenken, Koen & Hardeman, Sjoerd & Hoekman, Jarno, 2009. "Spatial scientometrics: Towards a cumulative research program," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 222-232.
    22. Howard D. White, 2003. "Author cocitation analysis and Pearson's r," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 54(13), pages 1250-1259, November.
    23. Wang, Yuandi & Hu, Ruifeng & Liu, Meijun, 2017. "The geotemporal demographics of academic journals from 1950 to 2013 according to Ulrich’s database," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 655-671.
    24. Tomislav Hengl & Budiman Minasny & Michael Gould, 2009. "A geostatistical analysis of geostatistics," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 80(2), pages 491-514, August.
    25. Elham Erfanian & Amir B. Ferreira Neto, 2017. "Scientific output: labor or capital intensive? An analysis for selected countries," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 112(1), pages 461-482, July.
    26. Bornmann, Lutz & Waltman, Ludo, 2011. "The detection of “hot regions” in the geography of science—A visualization approach by using density maps," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 547-553.
    27. Jesper W. Schneider & Pia Borlund, 2007. "Matrix comparison, Part 2: Measuring the resemblance between proximity measures or ordination results by use of the mantel and procrustes statistics," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 58(11), pages 1596-1609, September.
    28. L. John Old, 2001. "Utilizing spatial information systems for non-spatial-data analysis," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 50(3), pages 563-571, January.
    29. Kevin W. Boyack & Richard Klavans & Katy Börner, 2005. "Mapping the backbone of science," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 64(3), pages 351-374, August.
    30. Jesper W. Schneider & Pia Borlund, 2007. "Matrix comparison, Part 1: Motivation and important issues for measuring the resemblance between proximity measures or ordination results," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 58(11), pages 1586-1595, September.
    31. Loet Leydesdorff & Liwen Vaughan, 2006. "Co‐occurrence matrices and their applications in information science: Extending ACA to the Web environment," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 57(12), pages 1616-1628, October.
    32. André Andrian Padial & João Carlos Nabout & Tadeu Siqueira & Luis Mauricio Bini & José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho, 2010. "Weak evidence for determinants of citation frequency in ecological articles," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 85(1), pages 1-12, October.
    33. Fereshteh Didegah & Mike Thelwall, 2013. "Determinants of research citation impact in nanoscience and nanotechnology," Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 64(5), pages 1055-1064, May.
    34. González-Albo, Borja & Bordons, María, 2011. "Articles vs. proceedings papers: Do they differ in research relevance and impact? A case study in the Library and Information Science field," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 369-381.
    35. Waltman, L. & van Eck, N.J.P., 2009. "Some Comments on Egghe’s Derivation of the Impact Factor Distribution," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2009-016-LIS, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    36. Thomas Bolli & Jörg Schläpfer, 2015. "Job mobility, peer effects, and research productivity in economics," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 104(3), pages 629-650, September.
    37. Richard Klavans & Kevin W. Boyack, 2006. "Identifying a better measure of relatedness for mapping science," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 57(2), pages 251-263, January.
    38. Arnold Verbeek & Koenraad Debackere, 2006. "Patent evolution in relation to public/private R&D investment and corporate profitability: Evidence from the United States," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 66(2), pages 279-294, February.
    39. Nees Jan Eck & Ludo Waltman, 2010. "Software survey: VOSviewer, a computer program for bibliometric mapping," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 84(2), pages 523-538, August.
    40. Vieira, E.S. & Gomes, J.A.N.F., 2010. "Citations to scientific articles: Its distribution and dependence on the article features," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 1-13.
    41. Richard Harris & John Moffat & Victoria Kravtsova, 2011. "In Search of ‘ W ’," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 249-270, February.
    42. Waltman, Ludo & van Eck, Nees Jan, 2015. "Field-normalized citation impact indicators and the choice of an appropriate counting method," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 872-894.
    43. Katy Börner & Wolfgang Glänzel & Andrea Scharnhorst & Peter Besselaar, 2011. "Modeling science: studying the structure and dynamics of science," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 89(1), pages 347-348, October.
    44. Cliff Frohlich & Lynn Resler, 2001. "Analysis of publications and citations from a geophysics research institute," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 52(9), pages 701-713.
    45. Clément Bosquet & Pierre-Philippe Combes, 2013. "Are academics who publish more also more cited? Individual determinants of publication and citation records," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 97(3), pages 831-857, December.
    46. Dangzhi Zhao & Andreas Strotmann, 2008. "Evolution of research activities and intellectual influences in information science 1996–2005: Introducing author bibliographic‐coupling analysis," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 59(13), pages 2070-2086, November.
    47. Bornmann, Lutz & Leydesdorff, Loet, 2012. "Which are the best performing regions in information science in terms of highly cited papers? Some improvements of our previous mapping approaches," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 336-345.
    48. J. Elhorst, 2010. "Applied Spatial Econometrics: Raising the Bar," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 9-28.
    49. L. John Old, 2001. "Utilizing spatial information systems for non-spatial-data analysis," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 51(3), pages 563-571, July.
    50. Tappeiner, Gottfried & Hauser, Christoph & Walde, Janette, 2008. "Regional knowledge spillovers: Fact or artifact?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 861-874, June.
    51. Tang, Li, 2013. "Does “birds of a feather flock together” matter—Evidence from a longitudinal study on US–China scientific collaboration," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 330-344.
    52. Iman Tahamtan & Askar Safipour Afshar & Khadijeh Ahamdzadeh, 2016. "Factors affecting number of citations: a comprehensive review of the literature," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 107(3), pages 1195-1225, June.
    53. Dag W. Aksnes, 2003. "A macro study of self-citation," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 56(2), pages 235-246, February.
    54. Ali Gazni & Mike Thelwall, 2014. "The long-term influence of collaboration on citation patterns," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(3), pages 261-271.
    55. Chaomei Chen, 2012. "Predictive effects of structural variation on citation counts," Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 63(3), pages 431-449, March.
    56. Cabrer-Borras, Bernardi & Serrano-Domingo, Guadalupe, 2007. "Innovation and R&D spillover effects in Spanish regions: A spatial approach," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1357-1371, November.
    57. Getis, Arthur, 2007. "Reflections on spatial autocorrelation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 491-496, July.
    58. Blaise Cronin, 2008. "On the epistemic significance of place," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 59(6), pages 1002-1006, April.
    59. Rodrigo Costas & Thed N. Leeuwen & María Bordons, 2010. "Self-citations at the meso and individual levels: effects of different calculation methods," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 82(3), pages 517-537, March.
    60. Joris Pinkse & Margaret E. Slade, 2010. "The Future Of Spatial Econometrics," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 103-117, February.
    61. Wolfgang Glänzel & Koenraad Debackere & Bart Thijs & András Schubert, 2006. "A concise review on the role of author self-citations in information science, bibliometrics and science policy," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 67(2), pages 263-277, May.
    62. Bornmann, Lutz & Schier, Hermann & Marx, Werner & Daniel, Hans-Dieter, 2012. "What factors determine citation counts of publications in chemistry besides their quality?," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 11-18.
    63. Chaomei Chen, 2012. "Predictive effects of structural variation on citation counts," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 63(3), pages 431-449, March.
    64. Fereshteh Didegah & Mike Thelwall, 2013. "Determinants of research citation impact in nanoscience and nanotechnology," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 64(5), pages 1055-1064, May.
    65. Hennemann, Stefan & Rybski, Diego & Liefner, Ingo, 2012. "The myth of global science collaboration—Collaboration patterns in epistemic communities," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 217-225.
    66. S. Hennemann & T. Wang & I. Liefner, 2011. "Measuring regional science networks in China: a comparison of international and domestic bibliographic data sources," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 88(2), pages 535-554, August.
    67. R. Inglesi-Lotz & A. Pouris, 2013. "The influence of scientific research output of academics on economic growth in South Africa: an autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) application," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 95(1), pages 129-139, April.
    68. Howard D. White & Katherine W. McCain, 1998. "Visualizing a discipline: An author co‐citation analysis of information science, 1972–1995," Journal of the American Society for Information Science, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 49(4), pages 327-355.
    69. Wallace, Matthew L. & Larivière, Vincent & Gingras, Yves, 2009. "Modeling a century of citation distributions," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 296-303.
    70. Mark D. Partridge & Marlon Boarnet & Steven Brakman & Gianmarco Ottaviano, 2012. "Introduction: Whither Spatial Econometrics?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 167-171, May.
    71. Egghe, L., 2009. "Mathematical derivation of the impact factor distribution," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 290-295.
    72. Ajiferuke, Isola & Famoye, Felix, 2015. "Modelling count response variables in informetric studies: Comparison among count, linear, and lognormal regression models," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 499-513.
    73. Waltman, Ludo & van Eck, Nees Jan & Noyons, Ed C.M., 2010. "A unified approach to mapping and clustering of bibliometric networks," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 629-635.
    74. Sakiru Adebola Solarin & Yuen Yee Yen, 2016. "A global analysis of the impact of research output on economic growth," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 108(2), pages 855-874, August.
    75. Jiang Wu, 2013. "Geographical knowledge diffusion and spatial diversity citation rank," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 94(1), pages 181-201, January.
    76. Nick Haslam & Lauren Ban & Leah Kaufmann & Stephen Loughnan & Kim Peters & Jennifer Whelan & Sam Wilson, 2008. "What makes an article influential? Predicting impact in social and personality psychology," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 76(1), pages 169-185, July.
    77. Zhang, Lin & Glänzel, Wolfgang, 2012. "Proceeding papers in journals versus the “regular” journal publications," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 88-96.
    78. Waltman, Ludo & van Eck, Nees Jan, 2009. "Some comments on Egghe's derivation of the impact factor distribution," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 363-366.
    79. Waltman, Ludo, 2016. "A review of the literature on citation impact indicators," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 365-391.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Mingyang Wang & Zhenyu Wang & Guangsheng Chen, 2019. "Which can better predict the future success of articles? Bibliometric indices or alternative metrics," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 119(3), pages 1575-1595, June.
    2. Tahamtan, Iman & Bornmann, Lutz, 2018. "Core elements in the process of citing publications: Conceptual overview of the literature," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 203-216.
    3. Kaile Gong & Juan Xie & Ying Cheng & Vincent Larivière & Cassidy R. Sugimoto, 2019. "The citation advantage of foreign language references for Chinese social science papers," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 120(3), pages 1439-1460, September.
    4. Iman Tahamtan & Askar Safipour Afshar & Khadijeh Ahamdzadeh, 2016. "Factors affecting number of citations: a comprehensive review of the literature," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 107(3), pages 1195-1225, June.
    5. Zahedi, Zohreh & Haustein, Stefanie, 2018. "On the relationships between bibliographic characteristics of scientific documents and citation and Mendeley readership counts: A large-scale analysis of Web of Science publications," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 191-202.
    6. Lanu Kim & Jason H. Portenoy & Jevin D. West & Katherine W. Stovel, 2020. "Scientific journals still matter in the era of academic search engines and preprint archives," Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 71(10), pages 1218-1226, October.
    7. Danielle H. Lee, 2019. "Predicting the research performance of early career scientists," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 121(3), pages 1481-1504, December.
    8. Reingewertz, Yaniv & Lutmar, Carmela, 2018. "Academic in-group bias: An empirical examination of the link between author and journal affiliation," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 74-86.
    9. Stefano Mammola & Diego Fontaneto & Alejandro Martínez & Filipe Chichorro, 2021. "Impact of the reference list features on the number of citations," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 126(1), pages 785-799, January.
    10. Jesùs Mur, 2013. "Causality, Uncertainty and Identification: Three Issues on the Spatial Econometrics Agenda," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2013(1), pages 5-27.
    11. Yun, Jinhyuk & Ahn, Sejung & Lee, June Young, 2020. "Return to basics: Clustering of scientific literature using structural information," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4).
    12. Bornmann, Lutz, 2019. "Does the normalized citation impact of universities profit from certain properties of their published documents – such as the number of authors and the impact factor of the publishing journals? A mult," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 170-184.
    13. Danielle H. Lee, 2019. "Predictive power of conference-related factors on citation rates of conference papers," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 118(1), pages 281-304, January.
    14. Bornmann, Lutz & Haunschild, Robin & Mutz, Rüdiger, 2020. "Should citations be field-normalized in evaluative bibliometrics? An empirical analysis based on propensity score matching," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4).
    15. Guoqiang Liang & Haiyan Hou & Xiaodan Lou & Zhigang Hu, 2019. "Qualifying threshold of “take-off” stage for successfully disseminated creative ideas," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 120(3), pages 1193-1208, September.
    16. Mingyang Wang & Shi Li & Guangsheng Chen, 2017. "Detecting latent referential articles based on their vitality performance in the latest 2 years," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 112(3), pages 1557-1571, September.
    17. Martin Szomszor & David A. Pendlebury & Jonathan Adams, 2020. "How much is too much? The difference between research influence and self-citation excess," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 123(2), pages 1119-1147, May.
    18. Yifan Qian & Wenge Rong & Nan Jiang & Jie Tang & Zhang Xiong, 2017. "Citation regression analysis of computer science publications in different ranking categories and subfields," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 110(3), pages 1351-1374, March.
    19. Ajiferuke, Isola & Famoye, Felix, 2015. "Modelling count response variables in informetric studies: Comparison among count, linear, and lognormal regression models," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 499-513.
    20. Martínez, Constanza & León, Carlos, 2016. "The cost of collateralized borrowing in the Colombian money market: Does connectedness matter?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 193-205.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:infome:v:13:y:2019:i:1:p:238-254. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Nithya Sathishkumar). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joi .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.