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Trade, technology, and the rise of the service sector: The effects on US wage inequality

  • Blum, Bernardo S.
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    This paper uses a multi-sector version of the Ricardo-Viner model of international trade to quantify empirically the effects of technological changes, international trade, changes in the sectoral composition of the economy, and other factors on the US wage premium. The main finding of the paper is that changes in the sectoral composition of the economy were the most important force behind the widening of the wage gap, accounting for about 60% of the relative increase in wages of skilled workers between 1970 and 1996. In essence, capital was reallocated to sectors where it is relatively complementary to skilled workers.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022-1996(07)00111-0
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of International Economics.

    Volume (Year): 74 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (March)
    Pages: 441-458

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:inecon:v:74:y:2008:i:2:p:441-458
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505552

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