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Austerity and health in Europe

Listed author(s):
  • Quaglio, GianLuca
  • Karapiperis, Theodoros
  • Van Woensel, Lieve
  • Arnold, Elleke
  • McDaid, David
Registered author(s):

    Many European governments have abundantly cut down public expenditure on health during the financial crisis. Consequences of the financial downturn on health outcomes have begun to emerge. This recession has led to an increase in poor health status, raising rates of anxiety and depression among the economically vulnerable. In addition, the incidence of some communicable diseases along with the rate of suicide has increased significantly. The recession has also driven structural reforms, and affected the priority given to public policies. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how austerity impacts health in Europe and better understand the response of European health systems to the financial crisis.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168851013002303
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

    Volume (Year): 113 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 13-19

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:113:y:2013:i:1:p:13-19
    DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2013.09.005
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol

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