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Price and volatility spillovers between the Greater China Markets and the developed markets of US and Japan


  • Wang, Ping
  • Wang, Peijie


In this paper, we have examined stock market linkages between Greater China and the US and Japan in terms of volatility and price spillovers, yielding a few findings, with most of them either offering new evidence or challenging the results in the previous research, and the rest consolidating previous stylish conclusions. It has been established that volatility spillovers are stronger than price spillovers between the Greater China markets and the developed markets of the US and Japan. The dominance effect of developed markets over developing markets does not show up in the present study. Moreover, the extent of influence by the developed market on the developing market is found to be associated with the degree of market openness of the developing economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Ping & Wang, Peijie, 2010. "Price and volatility spillovers between the Greater China Markets and the developed markets of US and Japan," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 304-317.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:glofin:v:21:y:2010:i:3:p:304-317

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Lee, Bong-Soo & Rui, Oliver Meng & Wang, Steven Shuye, 2004. "Information transmission between the NASDAQ and Asian second board markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1637-1670, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Huo, Rui & Ahmed, Abdullahi D., 2017. "Return and volatility spillovers effects: Evaluating the impact of Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 260-272.
    2. Ahmet Inci, 2011. "Capital Investment, Earnings, and Annual Stock Returns: Causality Relationships In China," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 1(2), pages 95-125, December.
    3. Jin, Xiaoye, 2015. "Volatility transmission and volatility impulse response functions among the Greater China stock markets," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 43-58.
    4. Li, Hong, 2012. "The impact of China's stock market reforms on its international stock market linkages," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 358-368.
    5. Gilenko, Evgenii & Fedorova, Elena, 2014. "Internal and external spillover effects for the BRIC countries: Multivariate GARCH-in-mean approach," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 32-45.
    6. Mensi, Walid & Beljid, Makram & Boubaker, Adel & Managi, Shunsuke, 2013. "Correlations and volatility spillovers across commodity and stock markets: Linking energies, food, and gold," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 15-22.
    7. Abbas, Qaisar & Khan, Sabeen & Shah, Syed Zulfiqar Ali, 2013. "Volatility transmission in regional Asian stock markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 66-77.
    8. Kundu, Srikanta & Sarkar, Nityananda, 2016. "Return and volatility interdependences in up and down markets across developed and emerging countries," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 297-311.


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