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Daily income target effects: Evidence from a large sample of professional commodities traders

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  • Locke, Peter R.
  • Mann, Steven C.

Abstract

We provide evidence of rational reference-dependent preferences in the proprietary trading of professional traders. We find increased trading effort and risk taking by traders following morning losses. Further analysis provides no evidence of a deterioration in trading performance subsequent to losses, as neither risk-adjusted performance nor trade execution appear to be negatively affected by prior losses. The evidence supports the existence of rational reference-dependent preferences in the form of trader daily income targets: these professional traders exhibit increased work effort subsequent to abnormal morning losses. The evidence is inconsistent with the alternative explanation of costly loss aversion.

Suggested Citation

  • Locke, Peter R. & Mann, Steven C., 2009. "Daily income target effects: Evidence from a large sample of professional commodities traders," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 814-831, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finmar:v:12:y:2009:i:4:p:814-831
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pikulina, Elena & Renneboog, Luc & Ter Horst, Jenke & Tobler, Philippe N., 2014. "Bonus schemes and trading activity," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 369-389.

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