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Housing and the cost of living in early modern Toledo

Author

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  • Drelichman, Mauricio
  • González Agudo, David

Abstract

Data on housing costs and rental markets for the early modern period are notoriously scarce. Using a new database of rent paid on 183 properties belonging to the Cathedral Chapter of Toledo between 1489 and 1600, we reconstruct housing costs for various social groups and trace the effect of exogenous shocks on the rental market using hedonic techniques. We document a well-functioning market that responded swiftly and predictably to exogenous shocks. We then explore the impact of adding rent to early modern price indices and estimates of living standards. Price indices show a moderate effect. The addition of rent reduces the gap between Toledo and two northern European locations by up to 9.5%.

Suggested Citation

  • Drelichman, Mauricio & González Agudo, David, 2014. "Housing and the cost of living in early modern Toledo," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 27-47.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:54:y:2014:i:c:p:27-47
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eeh.2014.08.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrés Calderón-Fernández & Héctor García-Montero & Enrique Llopis-Agelán, 2017. "New research guidelines for living standards, consumer baskets, and prices in Madrid and Mexico," Working Papers 097, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    2. repec:oup:ereveh:v:20:y:2016:i:3:p:322-344. is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jaime Reis, 2016. "The Gross Agricultural Output of Portugal: A Quantitative, Unified Perspective, 1500-1850," Working Papers 0098, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    4. repec:zbw:espost:167600 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Ali Coşkun Tuncer & Gürer Karagedikli, 2016. "‘The people next door’: housing and neighbourhood in eighteenth-century Ottoman Edirne," Working Papers 16010, Economic History Society.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Housing; Rent indices; Living standards; Hedonic analysis; Early modern period; Spain;

    JEL classification:

    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets
    • N34 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: 1913-
    • N94 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Europe: 1913-

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