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Home Demand and British Industrialization

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  • Horrell, Sara

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  • Horrell, Sara, 1996. "Home Demand and British Industrialization," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(03), pages 561-604, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:56:y:1996:i:03:p:561-604_01
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    Cited by:

    1. Nico Voigtländer & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Why England? Demographic factors, structural change and physical capital accumulation during the Industrial Revolution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 319-361, December.
    2. Hans-Joachim Voth, 2013. "The Three Horsemen of Riches: Plague, War, and Urbanization in Early Modern Europe," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(2), pages 774-811.
    3. Nico Voigtländer & Joachim Voth, 2005. "Why England? Demand, growth and inequality during the Industrial Revolution," Economics Working Papers 857, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Dec 2006.
    4. Wang, Ping & Xie, Danyang, 2004. "Activation of a modern industry," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 393-410, August.
    5. Gerben Bakker, 2011. "Leisure Time, Cinema and the Structure of Household Entertainment Expenditure, 1890–1940," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Leisure, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Bas van Leeuwen & Jieli van Leeuwen-Li & Reinhard Pirngruber, 2013. "The standard of living in ancient societies: a comparison between the Han Empire, the Roman Empire, and Babylonia," Working Papers 0045, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    7. Andreas Chai, 2011. "Consumer specialization and the Romantic transformation of the British Grand Tour of Europe," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 181-203, October.
    8. Jonathan Hersh & Joachim Voth, 2009. "Sweet diversity: Colonial goods and the rise of European living standards after 1492," Economics Working Papers 1163, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jan 2011.
    9. Gregory Clark, 2005. "The Condition of the Working Class in England, 1209-2004," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(6), pages 1307-1340, December.
    10. Robert C. Allen, 2005. "Capital Accumulation, Technological Change, and the Distribution of Income during the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 239, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    11. Drelichman, Mauricio & González Agudo, David, 2014. "Housing and the cost of living in early modern Toledo," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 27-47.
    12. Hans-Joachim Voth, 2003. "Living Standards During the Industrial Revolution: An Economist's Guide," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 221-226, May.
    13. David Flacher, 2005. "Industrial Revolutions and Consumption: A Common Model to the Various Periods of Industrialization," Working Papers halshs-00132241, HAL.
    14. Sara Horrell & Jane Humphries & Ken Sneath, 2015. "Consumption conundrums unravelled," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(3), pages 830-857, August.
    15. Gazeley, Ian & Verdon, Nicola, 2014. "The first poverty line? Davies' and Eden's investigation of rural poverty in the late 18th-century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 94-108.
    16. Drelichman, Mauricio & Gonzalez Agudo, David, 2012. "What price a roof? Housing and the cost of living in 16th-century Toledo," Economics working papers mauricio_drelichman-2012-, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 21 May 2012.
    17. Allen, Robert C., 2009. "Engels' pause: Technical change, capital accumulation, and inequality in the british industrial revolution," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 418-435, October.
    18. Jörg Baten & Dorothee Crayen & Joachim Voth, 2007. "Poor, hungry and ignorant: Numeracy and the impact of high food prices in industrializing Britain, 1780-1850," Economics Working Papers 1120, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Dec 2011.
    19. David Flacher, 2005. "Industrial Revolutions and Consumption: A Common Model to the Various Periods of Industrialization," CEPN Working Papers halshs-00132241, HAL.
    20. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen, 2007. "Pessimism Preserved: Real Wages in the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 314, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    21. N. F. R. Crafts & C. Knick Harley, 2002. "Precocious British Industrialization: A General Equilibrium Perspective," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 200213, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
    22. Horrell, Sara & Humphries, Jane & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2001. "Destined for Deprivation: Human Capital Formation and Intergenerational Poverty in Nineteenth-Century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 339-365, July.
    23. Bakker, Gerben, 2007. "The evolution of entertainment consumption and the emergence of cinema, 1890-1940," Economic History Working Papers 22316, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    24. Robert C. Allen, 2009. "Agricultural productivity and rural incomes in England and the Yangtze Delta, c.1620-c.1820 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(3), pages 525-550, August.
    25. Allen, Robert C., 2001. "The Great Divergence in European Wages and Prices from the Middle Ages to the First World War," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 411-447, October.

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