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An experiment with multiple currencies: the American monetary system from 1838-60

  • Shambaugh, Jay C.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Explorations in Economic History.

Volume (Year): 43 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 609-645

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Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:43:y:2006:i:4:p:609-645
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622830

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  1. Gorton, Gary, 1999. "Pricing free bank notes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 33-64, August.
  2. Bodenhorn,Howard, 2000. "A History of Banking in Antebellum America," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521662857, Junio.
  3. Arthur J. Rolnick & Warren E. Weber, 1998. "The Suffolk Banking System reconsidered," Working Papers 587, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  4. Milton Friedman & Anna Jacobson Schwartz, 1970. "Monetary Statistics of the United States: Estimates, Sources, Methods," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie70-1, September.
  5. Christina D. Romer and David H. Romer., 1989. "Does Monetary Policy Matter? A New Test in the Spirit of Friedman and Schwartz," Economics Working Papers 89-107, University of California at Berkeley.
  6. Richard G. Anderson, 2003. "Some tables of historical U.S. currency and monetary aggregates data," Working Papers 2003-006, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  7. Rolnick, Arthur J. & Weber, Warren E., 1988. "Explaining the demand for free bank notes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 47-71, January.
  8. Arthur J. Rolnick & Warren E. Weber, 1982. "The Free Banking Era: new evidence on laissez-faire banking," Staff Report 80, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  9. Hugh Rockoff, 1999. "How Long Did It Take the United States to Become an Optimal Currency Area?," Departmental Working Papers 199910, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  10. Peter Temin, 1968. "The Economic Consequences of the Bank War," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 76, pages 257.
  11. Gorton, Gary, 1996. "Reputation Formation in Early Bank Note Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(2), pages 346-97, April.
  12. Gary Gorton, 1991. "The Enforceability of Private Money Contracts, Market Efficiency, and Technological Change," NBER Working Papers 3645, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Barry Eichengreen, 1992. "Golden Fetters: The Gold Standard and the Great Depression, 1919-1939," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number eich92-1, September.
  14. Fraas, Arthur, 1974. "The Second Bank of the United States: An Instrument for an Interregional Monetary Union," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 34(02), pages 447-467, June.
  15. Howard Bodenhorn & Hugh Rockoff, 1992. "Regional Interest Rates in Antebellum America," NBER Chapters, in: Strategic Factors in Nineteenth Century American Economic History: A Volume to Honor Robert W. Fogel, pages 159-187 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Rockoff, Hugh, 1974. "The Free Banking Era: A Reexamination," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 6(2), pages 141-67, May.
  17. King, Robert G., 1983. "On the economics of private money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 127-158.
  18. Rousseau, Peter L., 2006. "A common currency: early US monetary policy and the transition to the dollar," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 97-122, April.
  19. Senegas, Marc-Alexandre, 2000. "The Early Years of the Second Bank of the United States: An Historical Perspective on the Transition to EMU," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 5(1), pages 57-75, February.
  20. Bodenhorn, Howard, 2002. "Making The Little Guy Pay: Payments-System Networks, Cross-Subsidization, And The Collapse Of The Suffolk System," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 62(01), pages 147-169, March.
  21. Officer, Lawrence H., 2002. "The U.S. Specie Standard, 1792-1932: Some Monetarist Arithmetic," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 113-153, April.
  22. Bodenhorn, Howard, 1992. "Capital Mobility and Financial Integration in Antebellum America," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(03), pages 585-610, September.
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