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A study on evolution of energy intensity in China with heterogeneity and rebound effect

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  • Fan, Ruguo
  • Luo, Ming
  • Zhang, Pengfei

Abstract

Spatio-temporal heterogeneity and rebound effect are significant issues on evolution of energy intensity. This paper analyzed the local effect on the energy intensity evolution cross the thirty provinces of China from 1995 to 2011 applying the Geographically and Temporally Weighted Regression Model, calculated the rebound effect in both national and provincial levels during the same sample period above, and examined the effect of technological progress on energy intensity when there exists rebound effect. The results show that heterogeneity exists significantly in the evolution of China's energy intensity. On the point of view of the spatial and the temporal dimension, the identification of heterogeneity helps to comprehend the situation of the energy intensity which has been improved in higher degree during the period after 2000 than before, and more obviously in eastern region than central and western region. This paper also proves that the effect of technological progress on decreasing energy intensity is restricted because of the rebound effect. Therefore the spatio-temporal variation in the path of energy intensity's evolution should be fully considered, and corresponding policies are necessarily made to reduce rebound effect, which will lead to make the balanced development of energy consumption in different regions of China.

Suggested Citation

  • Fan, Ruguo & Luo, Ming & Zhang, Pengfei, 2016. "A study on evolution of energy intensity in China with heterogeneity and rebound effect," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 159-169.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:energy:v:99:y:2016:i:c:p:159-169
    DOI: 10.1016/j.energy.2016.01.041
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:quaeco:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:23-30 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Zhang, Yue-Jun & Peng, Hua-Rong & Su, Bin, 2017. "Energy rebound effect in China's Industry: An aggregate and disaggregate analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 199-208.
    3. repec:eee:energy:v:128:y:2017:i:c:p:575-585 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Jing Lin & Boqiang Lin, 2016. "How Much CO 2 Emissions Can Be Reduced in China’s Heating Industry," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(7), pages 1-16, July.

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