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Financing for climate change

Author

Listed:
  • Cooper, Richard N.

Abstract

This paper argues that the 2009 pledge of $100 billion in 2020 by rich countries for mitigation and adaptation should not be used for mitigation by commercial firms in developing countries, since that would artificially create competitive advantage for such firms and provoke protectionist reactions in the rich countries where firms must bear the costs of mitigation, thereby undermining the world trading system. The costs of heating the earth's surface should be borne by all emitters, just as the price of copper and other scarce resources is paid by all users, rich or poor. That will still leave scope for rich country help in adaptation to climate change and in bringing to fruition new technologies to reduce emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Cooper, Richard N., 2012. "Financing for climate change," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S1), pages 29-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:34:y:2012:i:s1:p:s29-s33
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2012.08.040
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Trevor Houser & Rob Bradley & Britt Childs, 2008. "Leveling the Carbon Playing Field: International Competition and US Climate Policy Design," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 4204.
    2. William R. Cline, 2011. "Carbon Abatement Costs and Climate Change Finance," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 6079.
    3. Trevor Houser & Jason Selfe, 2011. "Delivering on US Climate Finance Commitments," Working Paper Series WP11-19, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. George A. Gonzalez, 2016. "Transforming Energy: Solving Climate Change with Technology Policy . New York : Cambridge University Press . 360 pages. ISBN 9781107614970, $29.99 paperback. Anthony Patt , 2015 ," Review of Policy Research, Policy Studies Organization, vol. 33(1), pages 111-113, January.
    2. Jamie Robertsen & Nathalie Francken & Nadia Molenaers, 2015. "Determinants of the Flow of Bilateral Adaptation-Related Climate Change Financing to Sub-Saharan Africa," LICOS Discussion Papers 37315, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    3. Schmalensee, Richard, 2012. "From “Green Growth” to sound policies: An overview," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S1), pages 2-6.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financing climate change; Greenhouse gas emissions; Competitive advantage; Carbon charges;

    JEL classification:

    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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