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Is it in China's interest to implement an export carbon tax?

Author

Listed:
  • Li, Ji Feng
  • Wang, Xin
  • Zhang, Ya Xiong

Abstract

Considering the dual context of China's domestic willingness to have a cleaner export structure and the widespread concern among developed countries that carbon leakage from developing countries, particularly China, could threaten their own climate policy effectiveness; this paper uses the SICGE model to investigate the economic rationale of taxing direct CO2 emissions of export in China. With an export carbon tax set at 200 yuan/t CO2, three policy scenarios were studied, where the tax revenue is: undistributed; redistributed neutrally to stimulate investment; and redistributed neutrally to stimulate consumption. According to the model, the economic and climate effects of the different policy scenarios are not particularly distinguishable. The economic impacts are slightly negative while the effect on the export structure is significant: the export of major energy-intensive products decreased and the export of certain sectors (labour-intensive or with higher value-added) increased, resulting in a cut of 3.77% in total direct CO2 emissions from exports. The revenue redistribution to stimulate consumption is shown to be the optimal scenario choice, which was confirmed by further sensitivity tests. By reviewing related WTO laws, this paper concludes that a clearly designed export carbon tax with a comparable carbon price is in China's own interest, while lessening the carbon leakage concerns of developed countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Ji Feng & Wang, Xin & Zhang, Ya Xiong, 2012. "Is it in China's interest to implement an export carbon tax?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 2072-2080.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:34:y:2012:i:6:p:2072-2080
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2012.02.012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gourdon, Julien & Monjon, Stéphanie & Poncet, Sandra, 2016. "Trade policy and industrial policy in China: What motivates public authorities to apply restrictions on exports?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 105-120.
    2. Dong, Yanli & Ishikawa, Masanobu & Hagiwara, Taiji, 2015. "Economic and environmental impact analysis of carbon tariffs on Chinese exports," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 80-95.
    3. Yang, Mian & Fan, Ying & Yang, Fuxia & Hu, Hui, 2014. "Regional disparities in carbon dioxide reduction from China's uniform carbon tax: A perspective on interfactor/interfuel substitution," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 131-139.
    4. Hübler, Michael & Voigt, Sebastian & Löschel, Andreas, 2014. "Designing an emissions trading scheme for China—An up-to-date climate policy assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 57-72.
    5. repec:eee:appene:v:197:y:2017:i:c:p:270-278 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Dai, Rui & Zhang, Jianxiong, 2017. "Green process innovation and differentiated pricing strategies with environmental concerns of South-North markets," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 132-150.
    7. repec:eee:eneeco:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:478-489 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Li, Ji Feng & Wang, Xin & Zhang, Ya Xiong & Kou, Qin, 2014. "The economic impact of carbon pricing with regulated electricity prices in China—An application of a computable general equilibrium approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 46-56.
    9. repec:wsi:apjorx:v:34:y:2017:i:01:n:s0217595917400048 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Export tax; Carbon tax; Climate change; China; WTO;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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