IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/eneeco/v32y2010i1p210-219.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Greenhouse gas emissions in Hawai[modifier letter turned comma]i: Household and visitor expenditure analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Konan, Denise Eby
  • Chan, Hing Ling

Abstract

This paper focuses on petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions associated with economic activities in Hawai'i. Data on economic activity, petroleum consumption by type (gasoline, diesel, aviation fuel, residual, propane), and emissions factors are compiled and analyzed. In the baseline year 1997, emissions are estimated to total approximately 23.2Â million metric tons of carbon, 181 thousand metric tons of nitrous oxide, and 31 thousand metric tons of methane in terms of carbon-equivalent global warming potential over a 100-year horizon. Air transportation, electricity, and other transportation are the key economic activity responsible for GHG emissions associated with fossil fuel use. More than 22% of total emissions are attributed to visitor expenditures. On a per person per annum basis, emission rates generated by visitor demand are estimated to be higher than that of residents by a factor of 4.3 for carbon, 3.2 for methane, and 4.8 for nitrous oxide.

Suggested Citation

  • Konan, Denise Eby & Chan, Hing Ling, 2010. "Greenhouse gas emissions in Hawai[modifier letter turned comma]i: Household and visitor expenditure analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 210-219, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:210-219
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140-9883(09)00113-3
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Park, Hi-Chun & Heo, Eunnyeong, 2007. "The direct and indirect household energy requirements in the Republic of Korea from 1980 to 2000--An input-output analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 2839-2851, May.
    2. Kok, Rixt & Benders, Rene M.J. & Moll, Henri C., 2006. "Measuring the environmental load of household consumption using some methods based on input-output energy analysis: A comparison of methods and a discussion of results," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(17), pages 2744-2761, November.
    3. Roca, Jordi & Serrano, Monica, 2007. "Income growth and atmospheric pollution in Spain: An input-output approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 230-242, June.
    4. Rhee, Hae-Chun & Chung, Hyun-Sik, 2006. "Change in CO2 emission and its transmissions between Korea and Japan using international input-output analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(4), pages 788-800, July.
    5. Nässén, Jonas & Holmberg, John & Wadeskog, Anders & Nyman, Madeleine, 2007. "Direct and indirect energy use and carbon emissions in the production phase of buildings: An input–output analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1593-1602.
    6. Hawdon, David & Pearson, Peter, 1995. "Input-output simulations of energy, environment, economy interactions in the UK," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 73-86, January.
    7. Llop, Maria, 2007. "Economic structure and pollution intensity within the environmental input-output framework," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 3410-3417, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zafrilla, Jorge Enrique & López, Luis Antonio & Cadarso, María Ángeles & Dejuán, Óscar, 2012. "Fulfilling the Kyoto protocol in Spain: A matter of economic crisis or environmental policies?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 708-719.
    2. Bakhat, Mohcine & Rosselló, Jaume, 2013. "Evaluating a seasonal fuel tax in a mass tourism destination: A case study for the Balearic Islands," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 12-18.
    3. Kuo-Tsang Huang & Jen Chun Wang, 2015. "Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Tourism-Based Leisure Farms in Taiwan," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(8), pages 1-18, August.
    4. Xian Yang Zeng & Wong Ming Wong, 2014. "Decoupling Of Environmental Pressures From Economic Activities: Evidence From Taiwan," Global Journal of Business Research, The Institute for Business and Finance Research, vol. 8(4), pages 41-50.
    5. Kai Wang & Chang Gan & Yan Ou & Haolong Liu, 2019. "Low-Carbon Behaviour Performance of Scenic Spots in a World Heritage Site," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(13), pages 1-23, July.
    6. Nasseri, Iman & Assané, Djeto & Konan, Denise Eby, 2015. "While visitors conserve, residents splurge: Patterns and changes in energy consumption, 1997-2007," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 282-292.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:210-219. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.