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Supply and demand elasticities in the U.S. ethanol fuel market


  • Luchansky, Matthew S.
  • Monks, James


The market for ethanol has grown from approximately 1.2billion gallons in 1997 to almost 5billion gallons in 2006. With the huge increase in ethanol demand in recent years, the growth in derived demand for corn has driven up many food prices. This paper uses monthly data from 1997-2006 to estimate the market supply and demand for ethanol at the national level. The simultaneous determination of the supply and demand curves using two-stage least squares allows for the calculation of supply and demand-side elasticities, which are important results in light of the tremendous growth in this market and recent legislation concerning ethanol.

Suggested Citation

  • Luchansky, Matthew S. & Monks, James, 2009. "Supply and demand elasticities in the U.S. ethanol fuel market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 403-410, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:31:y:2009:i:3:p:403-410

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Baker, Allen & Zahniser, Steven, 2007. "Ethanol Reshapes the Corn Market," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, May.
    2. Gallagher, Paul W. & Shapouri, Hosein & Price, Jeffrey & Schamel, Guenter & Brubaker, Heather, 2003. "Some Long-Run Effects of Growing Markets and Renewable Fuel Standards on Additives Markets and the U.S. Ethanol Industry," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10648, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ladislav Kristoufek & Karel Janda & David Zilberman, 2013. "Non-linear price transmission between biofuels, fuels and food commodities," Working Papers IES 2013/16, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Oct 2013.
    2. Qiu, Cheng & Colson, Gregory & Wetzstein, Michael, 2014. "An ethanol blend wall shift is prone to increase petroleum gasoline demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 160-165.
    3. repec:eee:eneeco:v:67:y:2017:i:c:p:111-120 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Tenkorang, Frank & Dority, Bree L. & Bridges, Deborah & Lam, Eddery, 2015. "Relationship between ethanol and gasoline: AIDS approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 63-69.
    5. de Freitas, Luciano Charlita & Kaneko, Shinji, 2011. "Ethanol demand in Brazil: Regional approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2289-2298, May.
    6. Ladislav Kristoufek & Karel Janda & David Zilberman, 2012. "Mutual Responsiveness of Biofuels, Fuels and Food Prices," CAMA Working Papers 2012-38, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    7. McPhail, Lihong Lu & Babcock, Bruce A., 2012. "Impact of US biofuel policy on US corn and gasoline price variability," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 505-513.
    8. Gardebroek, Cornelis & Hernandez, Manuel A., 2013. "Do energy prices stimulate food price volatility? Examining volatility transmission between US oil, ethanol and corn markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 119-129.
    9. Perdiguero, Jordi & Jiménez, Juan Luis, 2011. "Sell or not sell biodiesel: Local competition and government measures," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 1525-1532, April.
    10. Scheitrum, Daniel, 2017. "Renewable Natural Gas as a Solution to Climate Goals: Response to California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard," MPRA Paper 77193, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Hanon, Tristan, 2014. "The New Normal: A Policy Analysis of the US Renewable Fuel Standard," SS-AAEA Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Serra, Teresa, 2011. "Volatility spillovers between food and energy markets: A semiparametric approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1155-1164.
    13. Adewuyi, Adeolu O., 2016. "Determinants of import demand for non-renewable energy (petroleum) products: Empirical evidence from Nigeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 73-93.
    14. Collantes, Gustavo, 2010. "Do green tech policies need to pass the consumer test?: The case of ethanol fuel," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1235-1244, November.
    15. repec:eee:eneeco:v:67:y:2017:i:c:p:35-48 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Derek Lemoine, 2017. "Escape from Third-Best: Rating Emissions for Intensity Standards," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 67(4), pages 789-821, August.
    17. Walls, W.D. & Rusco, Frank & Kendix, Michael, 2011. "Biofuels policy and the US market for motor fuels: Empirical analysis of ethanol splashing," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 3999-4006, July.
    18. Chanthawong, Anuman & Dhakal, Shobhakar & Jongwanich, Juthathip, 2016. "Supply and demand of biofuels in the fuel market of Thailand: Two stage least square and three least square approaches," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 431-443.
    19. repec:spr:empeco:v:52:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00181-016-1112-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Wang, Zidong & Fan, Xin Xin & Liu, Pan & Dharmasena, Senarath, 2016. "Demand for Ethanol in the Face of Blend Wall: Is it a Complement or a Substitute for Conventional Transportation Fuel in the United States?," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 229960, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    21. Mcphail, Lihong Lu, 2010. "Impacts of renewable fuel regulation and production on agriculture, energy, and welfare," ISU General Staff Papers 201001010800002237, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    22. Andrian, Leandro Gaston, 2010. "Essays on energy economics: Microeconomic and macroeconomic dimensions," ISU General Staff Papers 201001010800002725, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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