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What is the value of corporate sponsorship in sports?

Author

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  • Narayan, Paresh Kumar
  • Rath, Badri Narayan
  • Prabheesh, K.P.

Abstract

This paper investigates the stock market reaction to investor mood swings resulting from the Indian Premier League (IPL) cricket matches. We find that stocks listed on the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) that sponsor the IPL cricket are unaffected by the cricket matches. This finding is robust along two lines: (a) the effect is insignificant both statistically and economically which we demonstrate using a simple trading strategy; and (b) results hold across a wide range of portfolios. Our results, both statistical and trading strategy-based, suggest that the portfolios of companies that sponsor cricket in India are efficient. Our findings stand in sharp contrast to the evidence obtained by the broader sports literature suggesting that sports actually impact stock returns, driven principally by psychological factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Rath, Badri Narayan & Prabheesh, K.P., 2016. "What is the value of corporate sponsorship in sports?," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 20-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ememar:v:26:y:2016:i:c:p:20-33
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ememar.2016.02.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Stock market; Cricket; Trading strategy; Profits;

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