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Can international environmental cooperation be bought: Comment

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  • Glanemann, Nicole

Abstract

Fuentes-Albero and Rubio (2010) analytically examine the effects of the countries’ heterogeneity on the international environmental cooperation. They consider two types of countries having different abatement costs in one case and different environmental damages in another case. Furthermore it is analyzed whether a self-financed transfer system can diminish these heterogeneity effects. The paper shows for both scenarios of asymmetry and no transfers that the maximum level of cooperation consists of three countries of the same type. For the case of heterogeneity in environmental damages, Fuentes-Albero and Rubio conclude that an agreement between one type 1 and one type 2 country is also self-enforcing given that the differences in the damages are not very large. In this comment, the derivation of the last mentioned result is shown to be incorrect by proving that this coalition is not self-enforcing.

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  • Glanemann, Nicole, 2012. "Can international environmental cooperation be bought: Comment," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 216(3), pages 697-699.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ejores:v:216:y:2012:i:3:p:697-699
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ejor.2011.08.005
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    1. Asheim, Geir B. & Froyn, Camilla Bretteville & Hovi, Jon & Menz, Fredric C., 2006. "Regional versus global cooperation for climate control," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 93-109, January.
    2. EYCKMANS, Johan & FINUS, Michael, 2003. "Coalition formation in a global warming game : how the design of protocols affects the success of environmental treaty-making," LIDAM Discussion Papers CORE 2003088, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    3. Fuentes-Albero, Cristina & Rubio, Santiago J., 2010. "Can international environmental cooperation be bought?," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 202(1), pages 255-264, April.
    4. Mendelsohn, Robert & Dinar, Ariel & Williams, Larry, 2006. "The distributional impact of climate change on rich and poor countries," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 159-178, April.
    5. Barrett, Scott, 2001. "International cooperation for sale," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 1835-1850, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michèle Breton & Lucia Sbragia, 2019. "The Impact of Adaptation on the Stability of International Environmental Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 74(2), pages 697-725, October.
    2. Håkon Sælen, 2016. "Side-payments: an effective instrument for building climate clubs?," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(6), pages 909-932, December.

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