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Where do fairness preferences come from? Norm transmission in a teen friendship network

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  • Hugh-Jones, David
  • Ooi, Jinnie

Abstract

We ran an experiment on transmission of fairness norms in a friendship network of 11–15 year olds. Experiment participants were able to observe a peer’s allocations between two anonymous others. Observing others’ choices affected both participants’ own choices and their expressed fairness judgments. Rather than learning a new norm, participants decided which of two already known norms applied in the experimental situation. We also use the social network to examine how social influence varies with friendship status and network position.

Suggested Citation

  • Hugh-Jones, David & Ooi, Jinnie, 2023. "Where do fairness preferences come from? Norm transmission in a teen friendship network," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 157(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:157:y:2023:i:c:s0014292123001277
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2023.104498
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    2. Dimant, Eugen, 2019. "Contagion of pro- and anti-social behavior among peers and the role of social proximity," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 66-88.

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