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Is monetary union necessarily counterproductive?

  • Diana, Giuseppe
  • Zimmer, Blandine

This paper analyses the case of a monetary union between identical countries characterised by oligopolistic competition in their labour market. It suggests that the switch to a common currency may improve their macroeconomic performances depending on labour market features.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V84-4GV8T02-1/2/4efe3e21dd362cfb446b84292d10af4e
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 89 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 61-67

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:89:y:2005:i:1:p:61-67
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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  1. Francesco Lippi, 2000. "Strategic Monetary Policy with Non Atomistic Wage Setters," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1354, Econometric Society.
  2. Rogoff, Kenneth, 1985. "The Optimal Degree of Commitment to an Intermediate Monetary Target," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1169-89, November.
  3. Lawler, Phillip, 2000. "Centralised Wage Setting, Inflation Contracts, and the Optimal Choice of Central Banker," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(463), pages 559-75, April.
  4. Alex Cukierman & Francesco Lippi, 2000. "Labor Markets and Monetary Union; a Strategic Analysis," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 365, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  5. Cukierman, Alex & Lippi, Francesco, 1999. "Central bank independence, centralization of wage bargaining, inflation and unemployment:: Theory and some evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 1395-1434, June.
  6. Soskice, David & Iversen, Torben, 1998. "Multiple Wage-Bargaining Systems in the Single European Currency Area," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(3), pages 110-24, Autumn.
  7. Guzzo, Vincenzo & Velasco, Andres, 1999. "The case for a populist Central Banker," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 1317-1344, June.
  8. Skott, Peter, 1997. "Stagflationary Consequences of Prudent Monetary Policy in a Unionized Economy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(4), pages 609-22, October.
  9. Robert J. Barro & David B. Gordon, 1981. "A Positive Theory of Monetary Policy in a Natural-Rate Model," NBER Working Papers 0807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Gruner, Hans Peter & Hefeker, Carsten, 1999. " How Will EMU Affect Inflation and Unemployment in Europe?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(1), pages 33-47, March.
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