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Inflation in South Africa. A long memory approach

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  • Gil-Alana, Luis A.

Abstract

This paper deals with the analysis of the inflation rate in South Africa for the time period 1970M1-2008M12. We use long range dependence techniques and the results show that inflation in this country is a covariance stationary process with long range dependence, with an order of integration ranging in the interval (0, 0.5). Policy implications are derived.

Suggested Citation

  • Gil-Alana, Luis A., 2011. "Inflation in South Africa. A long memory approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(3), pages 207-209, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:111:y:2011:i:3:p:207-209
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Backus, David K & Zin, Stanley E, 1993. "Long-Memory Inflation Uncertainty: Evidence from the Term Structure of Interest Rates," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 25(3), pages 681-700, August.
    2. Ireland, Peter N., 2000. "Expectations, Credibility, And Time-Consistent Monetary Policy," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(04), pages 448-466, December.
    3. Granger, C. W. J., 1980. "Long memory relationships and the aggregation of dynamic models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 227-238, October.
    4. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 2000. "Habit Formation in Consumption and Its Implications for Monetary-Policy Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 367-390, June.
    5. Koenker, Roger, 1981. "A note on studentizing a test for heteroscedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 107-112, September.
    6. Logan Rangasamy, 2009. "Inflation Persistence And Core Inflation: The Case Of South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(3), pages 430-444, September.
    7. Godfrey, Leslie G, 1978. "Testing for Higher Order Serial Correlation in Regression Equations When the Regressors Include Lagged Dependent Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1303-1310, November.
    8. Durbin, J, 1970. "Testing for Serial Correlation in Least-Squares Regression When Some of the Regressors are Lagged Dependent Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 38(3), pages 410-421, May.
    9. Godfrey, Leslie G, 1978. "Testing against General Autoregressive and Moving Average Error Models When the Regressors Include Lagged Dependent Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1293-1301, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Barros & Luis Gil-Alana, 2013. "Inflation Forecasting in Angola: A Fractional Approach," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 25(1), pages 91-104.
    2. Tschernig, Rolf & Weber, Enzo & Weigand, Roland, 2014. "Long- versus medium-run identification in fractionally integrated VAR models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 299-302.
    3. Rangan Gupta & Charl Jooste & Omid Ranjbar, 2015. "The Changing Dynamics of South Africa's Inflation Persistence: Evidence from a Quantile Regression Framework," Working Papers 201563, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    4. Phiri, Andrew, 2017. "Inflation persistence in BRICS countries: A quantile autoregressive (QAR) model," MPRA Paper 79956, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Andrew Phiri, 2017. "Inflation persistence in BRICS countries: A quantile autoregressive (QAR) approach," Working Papers 1702, Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University, revised Jul 2017.

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