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Controlling the Overall Significance Level of a Battery of Least Squares Diagnostic Tests


  • Leslie G. Godfrey


Double bootstrap methods are used to control the overall significance level of a battery of diagnostic tests applied to a regression model estimated by ordinary least squares. Monte Carlo evidence on the finite sample performance of the bootstrap methods is reported and discussed. Copyright 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Leslie G. Godfrey, 2005. "Controlling the Overall Significance Level of a Battery of Least Squares Diagnostic Tests," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(2), pages 263-279, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:67:y:2005:i:2:p:263-279

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. García-Pérez, J. Ignacio & Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando, 2003. "The nineties in Spain: too much flexibility in the youth labour market?," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb030302, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
    2. Katharine G. Abraham, 1988. "Flexible Staffing Arrangements and Employers' Short-Term Adjustment Strategies," NBER Working Papers 2617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. David H. Autor, 2001. "Why Do Temporary Help Firms Provide Free General Skills Training?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1409-1448.
    4. Lewis M. Segal & Daniel G. Sullivan, 1997. "The Growth of Temporary Services Work," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 117-136, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher J. Bennett, 2009. "p-Value Adjustments for Asymptotic Control of the Generalized Familywise Error Rate," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0905, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    2. Martin Huber & Giovanni Mellace, 2015. "Testing Instrument Validity for LATE Identification Based on Inequality Moment Constraints," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(2), pages 398-411, May.
    3. Huber, Martin & Mellace, Giovanni, 2011. "Testing instrument validity in sample selection models," Economics Working Paper Series 1145, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    4. Gungor, Sermin & Luger, Richard, 2015. "Bootstrap Tests Of Mean-Variance Efficiency With Multiple Portfolio Groupings," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 91(1-2), pages 35-65, Mars-Juin.
    5. James G. MacKinnon, 2007. "Bootstrap Hypothesis Testing," Working Papers 1127, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    6. Christopher J. Bennett, 2009. "Consistent and Asymptotically Unbiased MinP Tests of Multiple Inequality Moment Restrictions," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0908, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.

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