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Convergence speed and preference externalities in a one-sector model with elastic labor supply

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  • Nakamoto, Yasuhiro

Abstract

In a one-sector model with elastic labor supply where consumption and leisure externalities are incorporated, we examine the impact of preference externalities on convergence speed.

Suggested Citation

  • Nakamoto, Yasuhiro, 2009. "Convergence speed and preference externalities in a one-sector model with elastic labor supply," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 86-89, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:105:y:2009:i:1:p:86-89
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. King, Robert G & Rebelo, Sergio T, 1993. "Transitional Dynamics and Economic Growth in the Neoclassical Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 908-931, September.
    2. Pintea, Mihaela I., 2010. "Leisure externalities: Implications for growth and welfare," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 1025-1040, December.
    3. Manuel A. Gómez, 2008. "Consumption And Leisure Externalities, Economic Growth And Equilibrium Efficiency," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 55(2), pages 227-249, May.
    4. Stephen Turnovsky & Cecilia Garcia Penalosa, 2006. "The Dynamics of Wealth and Income distribution in a Neoclassical Growth Model," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 318, Society for Computational Economics.
    5. Ramanathan, R, 1975. "The Elasticity of Substitution and the Speed of Convergence in Growth Models," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 85(339), pages 612-613, September.
    6. Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2002. "Intertemporal and intratemporal substitution, and the speed of convergence in the neoclassical growth model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(9-10), pages 1765-1785, August.
    7. Liu, Wen-Fang & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2005. "Consumption externalities, production externalities, and long-run macroeconomic efficiency," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 1097-1129, June.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Grodner, Andrew & Kniesner, Thomas J. & Bishop, John A., 2011. "Social Interactions in the Labor Market," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 6(4), pages 265-366, September.

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