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Consumption And Leisure Externalities, Economic Growth And Equilibrium Efficiency


  • Manuel A. Gómez


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  • Manuel A. Gómez, 2008. "Consumption And Leisure Externalities, Economic Growth And Equilibrium Efficiency," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 55(2), pages 227-249, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:55:y:2008:i:2:p:227-249

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jennifer Hunt, 1999. "Has Work-Sharing Worked in Germany?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 117-148.
    2. Silke Anger, 2005. "Working Time as an Investment? – The Effects of Unpaid Overtime on Wages, Promotions and Layoffs," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-032, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    3. John H. Tyler & Richard J. Murnane & John B. Willett, 2000. "Estimating the Labor Market Signaling Value of the GED," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 431-468.
    4. Massimiliano Bratti & Stefano Staffolani, 2007. "Effort-based career opportunities and working time," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(6), pages 489-512, September.
    5. Sousa-Poza, Alfonso & Ziegler, Alexandre, 2003. "Asymmetric information about workers' productivity as a cause for inefficient long working hours," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 727-747, December.
    6. Engellandt, Axel & Riphahn, Regina T., 2005. "Temporary contracts and employee effort," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 281-299, June.
    7. David Campbell & Francis Green, 2002. "The Long Term Pay-Off From Working Longer Hours," Studies in Economics 0205, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    8. Meyer, Anna & Wallette, Mårten, 2005. "Absence of Absenteeism and Overtime work – Signaling Factors for Temporary Workers?," Working Papers 2005:15, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    9. Anger, Silke, 2005. "Unpaid Overtime in Germany: Differences between East and West," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 17-27.
    10. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2003. "A sticky floors model of promotion, pay, and gender," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 295-322, April.
    11. Bell, David N.F. & Hart, Robert A., 2003. "How Important Is Guaranteed or Institutionalised Overtime?," IZA Discussion Papers 766, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Michael Spence, 1973. "Job Market Signaling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 355-374.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nakamoto, Yasuhiro, 2009. "Convergence speed and preference externalities in a one-sector model with elastic labor supply," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 86-89, October.
    2. Azariadis, Costas & Chen, Been-Lon & Lu, Chia-Hui & Wang, Yin-Chi, 2013. "A two-sector model of endogenous growth with leisure externalities," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(2), pages 843-857.

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