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The effects of rules and communication in a behavioral irrigation experiment with power asymmetries carried out in North China

  • Otto, Ilona M.
  • Wechsung, Frank
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    In our field experiment carried out with stakeholders from the Chinese Haihe River Basin, a group of five players located along an irrigation channel first decide on the amount they would invest in a public fund for channel maintenance. In the next step, they choose the amount of water to withdraw from the channel to irrigate their plots of land. We compare the effects of different rules of water distribution and communication on three types of group participants: farmers, water administrators and students.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

    Volume (Year): 99 (2014)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 10-20

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:99:y:2014:i:c:p:10-20
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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