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The evolution of environmentally responsible investment: An Adam Smith perspective

  • Whittaker, Julie
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    This paper demonstrates that Adam Smith has common ground with contemporary social scientists who study the management of the common pool resources from an evolutionary perspective. Contrary to the caricature of Smith, presented by neoliberals, as a promoter of self-interest, he recognized the value of other-regarding behavior. Specifically focus is given to how such behavior can contribute to constructing institutional arrangements that can help to avoid damaging market excesses. A study of the development of a process to encourage investment behavior that is environmentally responsible, establishes that Smith's work has relevance for addressing environmental issues in our contemporary complex market system.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800911003399
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

    Volume (Year): 71 (2011)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 33-41

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:71:y:2011:i:c:p:33-41
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2011.08.006
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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