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REDD+ measurement, reporting and verification – A cost trap? Implications for financing REDD+MRV costs by result-based payments

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  • Köhl, Michael
  • Neupane, Prem Raj
  • Mundhenk, Philip

Abstract

The REDD+ initiative applies a market-based approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. The difference between the carbon stock of forests under historical deforestation and forest degradation rates and the actual C-stock achieved by forest conservation measures will be compensated financially. The difference in C-stocks is provided by a system of measurement, reporting and verification (MRV).

Suggested Citation

  • Köhl, Michael & Neupane, Prem Raj & Mundhenk, Philip, 2020. "REDD+ measurement, reporting and verification – A cost trap? Implications for financing REDD+MRV costs by result-based payments," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 168(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:168:y:2020:i:c:s0921800919305762
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2019.106513
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arild Angelsen, 2017. "REDD+ as Result-based Aid: General Lessons and Bilateral Agreements of Norway," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(2), pages 237-264, May.
    2. Cecilia Luttrell & Erin Sills & Riza Aryani & Andini Desita Ekaputri & Maria Febe Evinke, 2018. "Beyond opportunity costs: who bears the implementation costs of reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation?," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 291-310, February.
    3. Rakatama, Ari & Pandit, Ram & Ma, Chunbo & Iftekhar, Sayed, 2017. "The costs and benefits of REDD+: A review of the literature," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 103-111.
    4. Waggoner, Paul E., 2009. "Forest Inventories: Discrepancies and Uncertainties," Discussion Papers dp-09-29.pdf, Resources For the Future.
    5. World Bank & Ecofys, "undated". "State and Trends of Carbon Pricing 2018," World Bank Publications - Reports 29687, The World Bank Group.
    6. Nantongo, Mary & Vatn, Arild, 2019. "Estimating Transaction Costs of REDD+," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 1-11.
    7. Marigold Norman and Smita Nakhooda, 2014. "The State of REDD+ Finance - Working Paper 378," Working Papers 378, Center for Global Development.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Jack Baynes & Geoff P. Lovell & John Herbohn, 2021. "Psychological outcomes of REDD + projects: evidence from country case studies," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 1-27, April.
    3. Aino Assmuth & Janne Rämö & Olli Tahvonen, 2021. "Optimal Carbon Storage in Mixed-Species Size-Structured Forests," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 79(2), pages 249-275, June.

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