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Overcoming the process-structure divide in conceptions of Social-Ecological Transformation

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  • Sievers-Glotzbach, Stefanie
  • Tschersich, Julia

Abstract

A fundamental transformation towards sustainability in face of complex social-ecological challenges needs to initiate deep changes of those incumbent system structures that support unsustainable trajectories, while at the same time encouraging a diversity of alternative practices. A review of transformation approaches towards sustainability shows that these do not (sufficiently) link processes of change at the micro level to deep leverages of change in wider system structures.

Suggested Citation

  • Sievers-Glotzbach, Stefanie & Tschersich, Julia, 2019. "Overcoming the process-structure divide in conceptions of Social-Ecological Transformation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 1-1.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:164:y:2019:i:c:23
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2019.106361
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