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Generous Sustainability

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  • Gerlagh, Reyer

Abstract

I define “generous sustainability” as a combination of two conditions: neither instantaneous maximin utility nor attainable maximin utility should decrease over time. I provide a formal definition and study applications to a Climate Economy with bounded and with unbounded growth. Generosity is shown to require that GHG emissions are limited to levels that do not cause irreversible system damages if some group of people systematically value these systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerlagh, Reyer, 2017. "Generous Sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 94-100.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:136:y:2017:i:c:p:94-100
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.02.012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sustainability; Sustainable development; Intergenerational distribution; Growth; Climate;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • D90 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - General
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development

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