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Happy for how long? How social capital and economic growth relate to happiness over time

Listed author(s):
  • Bartolini, Stefano
  • Sarracino, Francesco

What predicts the evolution over time of subjective well-being? We correlate the trends of subjective well-being with the trends of social capital and/or GDP. We find that in the long and the medium run social capital largely predicts the trends of subjective well-being. In the short-term this relationship weakens. Indeed, in the short run, changes in social capital predict a much smaller portion of the changes in subjective well-being than over longer periods. GDP follows a reverse path, thus confirming the Easterlin paradox: in the short run GDP is more positively correlated to well-being than in the medium-term, while in the long run this correlation vanishes.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800914003140
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 108 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 242-256

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:108:y:2014:i:c:p:242-256
DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.10.004
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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