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Do academically deficient scholarship athletes earn higher wages subsequent to graduation?

  • Olbrecht, Alexandre

In this paper, data from the Baccalaureate & Beyond 93/97/03 survey is used to estimate the effects on the earnings of scholarship athletics participants subsequent to graduation. Former college athletes are found to have higher wages on average. Upon first glance, colleges and universities could use these results to argue on behalf of investments in athletics. However, by using quantile regression, it is shown that the positive wage premiums are not equivalent for all college athletes.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 28 (2009)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 611-619

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:28:y:2009:i:5:p:611-619
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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  1. Moshe Buchinsky, 1998. "Recent Advances in Quantile Regression Models: A Practical Guideline for Empirical Research," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 88-126.
  2. Long, James E & Caudill, Steven B, 1991. "The Impact of Participation in Intercollegiate Athletics on Income and Graduation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(3), pages 525-31, August.
  3. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. John M. Barron & Bradley T. Ewing & Glen R. Waddell, 2000. "The Effects Of High School Athletic Participation On Education And Labor Market Outcomes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 409-421, August.
  5. Li, Qi & Racine, Jeff, 2003. "Nonparametric estimation of distributions with categorical and continuous data," Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 266-292, August.
  6. James E. Long, 1995. "The effects of tastes and motivation on individual income," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(2), pages 338-351, January.
  7. Racine, Jeff & Li, Qi, 2004. "Nonparametric estimation of regression functions with both categorical and continuous data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 119(1), pages 99-130, March.
  8. Bradley Ewing, 1995. "High school athletics and the wages of black males," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 65-78, June.
  9. John Cawley, 2004. "The Impact of Obesity on Wages," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
  10. Henderson, Daniel J. & Olbrecht, Alexandre & Polachek, Solomon, 2005. "Do Former College Athletes Earn More at Work? A Nonparametric Assessment," IZA Discussion Papers 1882, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, August.
  12. Eide, Eric R. & Ronan, Nick, 2001. "Is participation in high school athletics an investment or a consumption good?: Evidence from high school and beyond," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 431-442, October.
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