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Calendar anomalies in cash and stock index futures: International evidence

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  • Floros, Christos
  • Salvador, Enrique

Abstract

This paper examines calendar anomalies (day-of-the-week and monthly seasonal effects) in cash and stock index futures returns. We consider daily data from FTSE100 (UK), FTSE/ASE-20 (Greece), S&P500 (US) and Nasdaq100 (US) spot and future indexes over the period 2004–2011. We employ a Regime-Switching specification which allows us to distinguish between different regimes corresponding to high and low volatile periods. The results show differences in the seasonal patterns in cash and futures indexes due to the existence of basis risk. Calendar effects are also conditioned to the market situation. During a low volatile situation these calendar effects tend to be positive, but these effects turn negative if the market is under a high volatile period. These findings are recommended to financial risk managers dealing with futures markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Floros, Christos & Salvador, Enrique, 2014. "Calendar anomalies in cash and stock index futures: International evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 216-223.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:37:y:2014:i:c:p:216-223
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2013.10.036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Elena Valentina Tilica, 2014. "The Month-of-the-Year Effect in Post-Communist East European Stock Markets," The Review of Finance and Banking, Academia de Studii Economice din Bucuresti, Romania / Facultatea de Finante, Asigurari, Banci si Burse de Valori / Catedra de Finante, vol. 6(1), pages 029-040, June.
    2. Kumar, Satish, 2016. "Revisiting calendar anomalies: Three decades of multicurrency evidence," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 16-32.
    3. repec:blg:journl:v:12:y:2017:i:1:p:95-109 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Boubaker, Heni & Sghaier, Nadia, 2015. "Semiparametric generalized long-memory modeling of some mena stock market returns: A wavelet approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 254-265.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Futures; Spot; Turn-of-the-month; Day-of-the-week; Regime-switching model; Volatility;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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