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Tobin's Q channel and monetary policy rules under incomplete exchange rate pass-through

  • Ida, Daisuke
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    This paper focuses on the role of the Tobin's Q channel in a two-country framework in which exporting firms set their prices on the basis of local currency pricing. Incomplete exchange rate pass-through significantly affects the Tobin's Q channel in each country compared with the case of complete exchange rate pass-through. We explore whether different specifications of monetary policy enhance social welfare. Regardless of the degree of home bias, a monetary policy rule that stabilizes domestic asset prices attains preferable outcomes to several alternative policy rules considered in our analysis. Notably, there are large gains from employing a domestic asset price rule when the home bias is large. A monetary policy rule that stabilizes the asset prices of both countries results in worse outcomes. Our simulation results suggest that stabilizing asset prices is important in an open economy with incomplete exchange rate pass-through.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

    Volume (Year): 33 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 733-740

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:33:y:2013:i:c:p:733-740
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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