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Sources of exchange rate fluctuations with Taylor rule fundamentals

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  • Kempa, Bernd
  • Wilde, Wolfram

Abstract

This paper investigates the sources of exchange rate fluctuations when monetary policy follows a Taylor rule interest rate reaction function. We first present a simple dynamic exchange rate model with Taylor rule fundamentals which is triangular in the long-run impacts of shocks to the output market, the interest rate differential, and the Taylor rule. We then proceed to assess the relative importance of various shocks in exchange rate determination by estimating a structural VAR with long-run identification restrictions based on the triangular structure of the model. We find demand shocks to be less important than in earlier VAR studies, with both supply shocks and nominal shocks explaining a substantial part of real exchange rate fluctuations.

Suggested Citation

  • Kempa, Bernd & Wilde, Wolfram, 2011. "Sources of exchange rate fluctuations with Taylor rule fundamentals," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2622-2627.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:28:y:2011:i:6:p:2622-2627 DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2011.08.004
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    Cited by:

    1. Kiptui, Moses, 2015. "Sources of Exchange Rate Fluctuations in Kenya: The Relative Importance of Real and Nominal Shocks," MPRA Paper 61515, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Bogdan CAPRARU & Norel Ionut MOISE & Andrei RADULESCU, 2015. "The Monetary Policy Of The National Bank Of Romania In The Inflation Targeting Era. A Taylor Rule Approach," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 16, pages 91-102, December.
    3. Baaziz, Yosra & Labidi, Moez & Lahiani, Amine, 2013. "Does the South African Reserve Bank follow a nonlinear interest rate reaction function?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 272-282.
    4. Yosra Baaziz, 2015. "Estimating Interest Rate Setting Behavior in Brazil: A LSTR Model Approach," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(2), pages 1-17, April.
    5. Atif, Syed Muhammad & Sauytbekova, Moldir & Macdonald, James, 2012. "The Determinants of Australian Exchange Rate: A Time Series Analysis," EconStor Preprints 65665, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    6. Chadwick, Meltem Gülenay & Fazilet, Fatih & Tekatli, Necati, 2015. "Understanding the common dynamics of the emerging market currencies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 120-136.
    7. Norman C. Miller, 2014. "Exchange Rate Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14981, April.
    8. Chen, Chuanglian & Yao, Shujie & Ou, Jinghua, 2017. "Exchange rate dynamics in a Taylor rule framework," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 158-173.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange rate fluctuations; Taylor rule; Structural VAR;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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