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The welfare effects of government's preferences over spending and its financing

  • Alper, C. Emre
  • Ardic, Oya Pinar
  • Mumcu, Ayse
  • Saglam, Ismail

In this paper we examine the welfare effects of government's preferences over consumption and investment spending under different methods of financing in a two-period OLG model. The government has a utility function defined over the decomposition of her spending over two periods and raises funds by issuing bonds and by printing money. She allocates her funds into consumption expenditure that benefits the current population and investment expenditure which benefits the future population. The model is calibrated using data on the U.S. economy for the period 1981-2004. The findings reveal that the government's choice of financing as well as composition of spending into consumption-investment have differing impacts on the welfare of the young and old generations.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

Volume (Year): 25 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 1-12

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:25:y:2008:i:1:p:1-12
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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