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Informal sector: The credit market channel

  • Straub, Stéphane

We build a model of firms' choice between formality and informality. Complying with costly registration procedures allows the firms to benefit from key public goods, enforcement of property rights and contracts, that make the participation in the formal credit market possible. In a moral hazard framework with credit rationing, their decision is shaped by the interaction between the cost of entry into formality, and the relative efficiency of formal versus informal credit mechanisms and their related institutional arrangements. The model is consistent with existing stylized facts on the determinants of informality.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 78 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 (December)
Pages: 299-321

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:78:y:2005:i:2:p:299-321
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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