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The influence of concrete support on child welfare program engagement, progress, and recurrence

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  • Rostad, Whitney L.
  • Rogers, Tia McGill
  • Chaffin, Mark J.

Abstract

Families living in poverty are significantly more likely to become involved with child welfare services, and consequently, referred to interventions that target abusive and neglectful parenting practices. Program engagement and retention are difficult to achieve, possibly because of the concrete resource insufficiencies that may have contributed to a family's involvement with services in the first place. Various strategies have been used to enhance program completion, such as motivational interventions, monetary incentives, and financial assistance with concrete needs. This study examines the influence of adjunctive concrete support provided by home visitors on families' (N=1754) engagement, retention, and satisfaction with services as well as parenting outcomes. Using propensity stratification, mixed modeling procedures revealed that increasing concrete support predicted greater engagement, satisfaction, goal attainment, and lower short-term recidivism. Results suggest that adjunctive concrete support is a potentially beneficial strategy for promoting service engagement and satisfaction and increasing short-term child safety.

Suggested Citation

  • Rostad, Whitney L. & Rogers, Tia McGill & Chaffin, Mark J., 2017. "The influence of concrete support on child welfare program engagement, progress, and recurrence," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 26-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:72:y:2017:i:c:p:26-33
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.10.014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kristen Shook Slack & Jane L. Holl & Bong Joo Lee & Marla McDaniel & Lisa Altenbernd & Amy Bush Stevens, 2003. "Child protective intervention in the context of welfare reform: The effects of work and welfare on maltreatment reports," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 517-536.
    2. Dworsky, Amy & Courtney, Mark E. & Zinn, Andrew, 2007. "Child, parent, and family predictors of child welfare services involvement among TANF applicant families," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 802-820, June.
    3. Martin, Sacha Klein & Lin, Duncan, 2003. "The Impact of Welfare Reform on Children: An Introduction," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(1-2), pages 1-15.
    4. Christina Paxson & Jane Waldfogel, 2002. "Work, Welfare, and Child Maltreatment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 435-474, July.
    5. Shook, Kristen, 1999. "Does the loss of welfare income increase the risk of involvement with the child welfare system?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(9-10), pages 781-814.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emily Keddell, 2019. "Algorithmic Justice in Child Protection: Statistical Fairness, Social Justice and the Implications for Practice," Social Sciences, MDPI, vol. 8(10), pages 1-22, October.
    2. Kim, Hyunil & Jonson-Reid, Melissa & Kohl, Patricia & Chiang, Chien-jen & Drake, Brett & Brown, Derek & McBride, Tim & Guo, Shenyang, 2020. "Latent class analysis risk profiles: An effective method to predict a first re-report of maltreatment?," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 80(C).
    3. Keddell, Emily & Cleaver, Kerri & Fitzmaurice, Luke, 2021. "The perspectives of community-based practitioners on preventing baby removals : Addressing legitimate and illegitimate factors," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
    4. Kenny, Kathleen S. & Barrington, Clare, 2018. "“People just don't look at you the same way”: Public stigma, private suffering and unmet social support needs among mothers who use drugs in the aftermath of child removal," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 209-216.
    5. Winters, Drew E. & Pierce, Barbara J. & Imburgia, Teresa M., 2020. "Concrete services usage on child placement stability: Propensity score matched effects," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 118(C).

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