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Access to post-secondary education: The importance of culture

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  • Finnie, Ross

Abstract

This paper first discusses the theoretical approaches regarding the choice of participating in post-secondary (or "higher") education, starting with a presentation of the standard neoclassical economics approach, and then adding concepts taken from the emerging behavioural economics literature to take into account “cultural” factors that affect access. The paper then presents the results of an empirical analysis based on a very rich Canadian dataset, the Youth in Transition Survey, which follows youth from age 15 through to age 25 and includes remarkably detailed information on family and other background factors as well as schooling experiences, which provides evidence that points to the importance of cultural influences on PSE choices. Policy implications for children in care are then discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Finnie, Ross, 2012. "Access to post-secondary education: The importance of culture," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1161-1170.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:34:y:2012:i:6:p:1161-1170
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2012.01.035
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1998. "Life Cycle Schooling and Dynamic Selection Bias: Models and Evidence for Five Cohorts of American Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(2), pages 262-333, April.
    2. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman, 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post--secondary Schooling," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 705-734, October.
    3. Matthew Rabin & Ted O'Donoghue, 1999. "Doing It Now or Later," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 103-124, March.
    4. James Heckman & Flavio Cunha, 2007. "The Technology of Skill Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 31-47, May.
    5. Daniel Kahneman, 2003. "Maps of Bounded Rationality: Psychology for Behavioral Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1449-1475, December.
    6. Michael B. Coelli, 2009. "Tuition fees and equality of university enrolment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(3), pages 1072-1099, August.
    7. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 2001. "The Dynamics of Educational Attainment for Black, Hispanic, and White Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(3), pages 455-499, June.
    8. Neill, Christine, 2009. "Tuition fees and the demand for university places," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 561-570, October.
    9. Matthew Rabin, 1998. "Psychology and Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 11-46, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Villegas, Susy & Rosenthal, James & O'Brien, Kirk & Pecora, Peter J., 2014. "Educational outcomes for adults formerly in foster care: The role of ethnicity," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 42-52.
    2. K. Bruce Newbold & W. Mark Brown, 2015. "The Urban–Rural Gap In University Attendance: Determinants Of University Participation Among Canadian Youth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 585-608, September.

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