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U.S. demographics and saving: Predictions of three saving models

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  • Auerbach, Alan J.
  • Cai, Jinyong
  • Kotlikoff, Laurence J.

Abstract

This paper compares the predictions of three different saving models with respect to the impact of projected U.S. demographic change on future U.S. saving rates. The three models are the life cycle model, the infinite horizon altruism model, and a reduced form econometric model. The findings for the different models indicate a great range of possible paths of future U.S. saving. However, the three models concur in predicting a peak in the U.S. national saving rate in the near future (within 15 years), followed by a significant decline in the saving rate thereafter. In fact, the findings suggest the strong possibility of negative U.S. saving rates beginning after 2030.
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  • Auerbach, Alan J. & Cai, Jinyong & Kotlikoff, Laurence J., 1991. "U.S. demographics and saving: Predictions of three saving models," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 135-156, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:crcspp:v:34:y:1991:i::p:135-156
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zeldes, Stephen P, 1989. "Consumption and Liquidity Constraints: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(2), pages 305-346, April.
    2. David A. Wise, 1989. "The Economics of Aging," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number wise89-1, April.
    3. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Willi Leibfritz, 1999. "From Deficit Delusion to the Fiscal Balance Rule: Looking for an Economically Meaningful Way to Assess Fiscal Policy," NBER Chapters,in: Generational Accounting around the World, pages 9-30 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Alan J. Auerbach & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Robert Hagemann & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 1989. "The Dynamics of an Aging Population: The Case of Four OECD Countries," NBER Working Papers 2797, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. James Banks & Richard Blundell, 1994. "Household Saving Behavior in the United Kingdom," NBER Chapters,in: International Comparisons of Household Saving, pages 169-206 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Shiyu Li & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Shuanglin Lin & Wing Thye Woo & Yunyun Jiang, 2016. "How Much Will China Save? Projecting China's National Savings Through 2040," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 255-274, September.

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