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Transition from inflation to price stability


  • Garber, Peter M.


This paper provides a detailed discussion of the real phenomena that materialized in the stabilization period which followed the German hyper-inflation. Significant real dislocations arose after the monetary reform; and these can be attributed to a government policy which subsidized heavy industry through the inflation tax proceeds. The "credibility problem" appears not to have been a significant factor in the post-reform dislocation.
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  • Garber, Peter M., 1982. "Transition from inflation to price stability," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 11-42, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:crcspp:v:16:y:1982:i::p:11-42

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fellner, William, 1980. "The Valid Core of Rationality Hypotheses in the Theory of Expectations," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 12(4), pages 763-787, November.
    2. Okun, Arthur M, 1978. "Efficient Disinflationary Policies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 348-352, May.
    3. Thomas J. Sargent, 1982. "The Ends of Four Big Inflations," NBER Chapters,in: Inflation: Causes and Effects, pages 41-98 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1978. "Unemployment Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 353-357, May.
    5. McCallum, Bennett T, 1980. "Rational Expectations and Macroeconomic Stabilization Policy: An Overview," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 12(4), pages 716-746, November.
    6. George L. Perry, 1978. "Slowing the Wage-Price Spiral: The Macroeconomic View," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 9(2), pages 259-299.
    7. Cagan, Phillip, 1980. "Reflections on Rational Expectations," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 12(4), pages 826-832, November.
    8. Flood, Robert P & Garber, Peter M, 1980. "An Economic Theory of Monetary Reform," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(1), pages 24-58, February.
    9. Laurence H. Meyer & Robert H. Rasche, 1980. "On the costs and benefits of anti-inflation policies," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Feb, pages 3-14.
    10. Taylor, John B, 1975. "Monetary Policy during a Transition to Rational Expectations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(5), pages 1009-1021, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kiguel, Miguel & Liviatan, Nissan, 1990. "The business cycle associated with exchange-rate-based stabilization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 513, The World Bank.
    2. Calvo, Guillermo A. & Vegh, Carlos A., 1999. "Inflation stabilization and bop crises in developing countries," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 24, pages 1531-1614 Elsevier.
    3. Vegh, Carlos, 1991. "Stopping High Inflation: An Analytical Overview," MPRA Paper 20175, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Tallman, Ellis W. & Wang, Ping, 1995. "Money demand and the relative price of capital goods in hyperinflations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 375-404, November.
    5. John B. Taylor, 1982. "The role of expectations in the choice of monetary policy," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 47-95.
    6. Stanley Fischer & Ratna Sahay & Carlos A. Végh, 2002. "Modern Hyper- and High Inflations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 837-880, September.
    7. Hans Joachim Voth, 2000. "With a bang, not a whimper: Pricking Germany's "stock market bubble" in 1927 and the slide into depression," Economics Working Papers 516, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    8. Leiderman, Leonardo & Liviatan, Nissan, 1989. "Macroeconomic performance before and after disinflation in Israel," Policy Research Working Paper Series 311, The World Bank.
    9. Ellis W. Tallman & De-Piao Tang & Ping Wang, 2003. "Nominal and Real Disturbances and Money Demand in Chinese Hyperinflation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(2), pages 234-249, April.
    10. S. Rao Aiyagari & R. Anton Braun & Zvi Eckstein, 1998. "Transaction Services, Inflation, and Welfare," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(6), pages 1274-1301, December.
    11. Rogers, John H. & Wang, Ping, 1995. "Output, inflation, and stabilization in a small open economy: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 271-293, April.

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