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The determinants of bilateral FDI: Is Asia different?

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  • Petri, Peter A.

Abstract

Intra-Asian foreign direct investment (FDI) is dominated by flows from high technology economies to medium technology economies, while FDI elsewhere primarily consists of flows among high technology economies. This distinctive pattern is not due simply to differences in the relative distribution of Asian FDI recipients by technology, or to systematic differences in Asia's technology characteristics. A gravity model analysis is used to explore whether Asian FDI patterns differ significantly from those elsewhere, and if so, in what ways. The results show that Asian FDI flows, in contrast to other FDI flows, systematically favor hosts with relatively low technology achievement and relatively strong intellectual property rights regimes. This type of “Asian exceptionalism” is consistent with “flying geese” theories that have argued that Asian development is the result of technology flows among economies that occupy nearby rungs of the technology ladder.

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  • Petri, Peter A., 2012. "The determinants of bilateral FDI: Is Asia different?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 201-209.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:23:y:2012:i:3:p:201-209 DOI: 10.1016/j.asieco.2011.01.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Lipsey, Robert E. & Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2011. "South–South FDI and Development in East Asia," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 11-31.
    2. Toure Mamoudou & Cédric Achille Mbeng Mezui, 2017. "Working Paper 271 - Facteurs déterminants des IDE en Afrique," Working Paper Series 2388, African Development Bank.
    3. Doytch, Nadia, 2015. "Sectoral FDI cycles in South and East Asia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 24-33.
    4. Latorre, María C. & Hosoe, Nobuhiro, 2016. "The role of Japanese FDI in China," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 226-241.
    5. Kamel ABDELLAH ( GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113 & ISG, UNIVERSITE DE TUNIS) & Dalila NICET-CHENAF (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113) & Eric ROUGIER (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113), 2012. "FDI and macroeconomic volatility: A close-up on the source countries," Cahiers du GREThA 2012-21, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    6. World Bank, "undated". "World Bank East Asia and Pacific Economic Update, April 2014 : Preserving Stability and Promoting Growth," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18378, The World Bank.
    7. Dalila Nicet-Chenaf & Eric Rougier, 2014. "Source and host country volatility and FDI : A gravity analysis of European investment to Middle East and North Africa," Larefi Working Papers 1405, Larefi, Université Bordeaux 4.
    8. Kym Anderson & Anna Strutt, 2014. "Emerging economies, productivity growth and trade with resource-rich economies by 2030," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, pages 590-606.
    9. Kahouli, Bassem & Maktouf, Samir, 2015. "The determinants of FDI and the impact of the economic crisis on the implementation of RTAs: A static and dynamic gravity model," International Business Review, Elsevier, pages 518-529.
    10. Kym Anderson & Anna Strutt, 2015. "Implications for Indonesia of Asia's Rise in the Global Economy," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(1), pages 69-94, April.
    11. Röttgers, Dirk & Grote, Ulrike, 2014. "Africa and the Clean Development Mechanism: What Determines Project Investments?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 201-212.
    12. Dalila NICET-CHENAF & Eric ROUGIER, 2014. "Output Volatility And Fdi To Middle East And North African Countries: A Close-Up On The Source Countries," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 40, pages 139-165.
    13. Enrique L. Kato-Vidal, 2013. "Foreign Investment and Wages: A Crowding-Out Effect in Mexico," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 50(2), pages 209-231, November.
    14. Anderson, Kym & Strutt, Anna, 2013. "South America’s Contribution to World Food Markets: GTAP Projections to 2030," Working Papers 145369, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    15. George Bulman & Robert Fairlie & Sarena Goodman & Adam Isen, 2016. "Parental Resources and College Attendance: Evidence from Lottery Wins," NBER Working Papers 22679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign direct investment; FDI; Asia; Technology transfer; Gravity model;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital

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