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Are FDI spillovers regional? Firm-level evidence from China

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  • Xu, Xinpeng
  • Sheng, Yu

Abstract

This paper examines whether spillovers from FDI occur at the national or regional level, using firm-level census data for the Chinese manufacturing industry between 2000 and 2003. We find that FDI provides significant positive spillovers for the productivity of firms in the same industry, but these spillovers are likely to be regional; that is, domestic firms benefit more from the presence of foreign firms in the same sector within the same region. The backward and forward linkage effects of FDI are negative with significant regional disparity. The geographic distribution of FDI also influences spillovers, with an increase in FDI inflow to the top FDI recipient provinces increasing the forward linkage spillovers. Our empirical results also suggest that domestic firms differ significantly in the extent to which they benefit from FDI, though domestic firms with high absorptive capacity are more likely to benefit from FDI.

Suggested Citation

  • Xu, Xinpeng & Sheng, Yu, 2012. "Are FDI spillovers regional? Firm-level evidence from China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 244-258.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:23:y:2012:i:3:p:244-258 DOI: 10.1016/j.asieco.2010.11.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lipsey, Robert E. & Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2011. "South–South FDI and Development in East Asia," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 11-31.
    2. repec:sdo:regaec:v:26:y:2017:i:3_5 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ramstetter, Eric D. & Haji Ahmad, Shahrazat Binti, 2013. "Do Multinationals Use Water and Energy Relatively Efficiently in Malaysian Manufacturing?," AGI Working Paper Series 2013-16, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    4. Cheryl Xiaoning Long & Galina Hale & Hirotaka Miura, 2014. "Productivity Spillovers from FDI in the People's Republic of China: A Nuanced View," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 31(2), pages 77-108, September.
    5. Tanaka, Kiyoyasu, 2015. "The impact of foreign firms on industrial productivity : evidence from Japan," IDE Discussion Papers 533, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    6. Ramstetter, Eric D. & Kohpaiboon, Archanun, 2013. "Foreign Ownership and Energy Efficiency in Thailand’s Local Manufacturing Plants," AGI Working Paper Series 2013-15, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    7. Anwar, Sajid & Sun, Sizhong, 2012. "FDI and market entry/exit: Evidence from China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 487-498.
    8. Petri, Peter A., 2012. "The determinants of bilateral FDI: Is Asia different?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 201-209.
    9. repec:eee:touman:v:54:y:2016:i:c:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Hübler, Michael, 2015. "Labor mobility and technology diffusion: A new concept and its application to rural Southeast Asia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 137-151.
    11. Petri, Peter A., 2012. "The determinants of bilateral FDI: Is Asia different?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 201-209.
    12. Mitsoyo Ando & Fukunari Kimura, 2015. "Globalization and Domestic Operations: Applying the JC/JD Method to Japanese Manufacturing Firms," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, pages 1-35.
    13. Kiyoyasu Tanaka & Yoshihiro Hashiguchi, 2015. "Spatial Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment: Evidence from the Yangtze River Delta in China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 23(2), pages 40-60, March.
    14. Tanaka, Kiyoyasu & Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro, 2012. "Spatial spillovers from FDI agglomeration : evidence from the Yangtze River Delta in China," IDE Discussion Papers 354, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    15. Herrerias, M.J. & Cuadros, A. & Luo, D., 2016. "Foreign versus indigenous innovation and energy intensity: Further research across Chinese regions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 1374-1384.
    16. Girma, Sourafel & Gong, Yundan & Görg, Holger & Lancheros, Sandra, 2015. "Estimating direct and indirect effects of foreign direct investment on firm productivity in the presence of interactions between firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 157-169.
    17. repec:eee:worbus:v:53:y:2018:i:1:p:75-84 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Fredrik Sjöholm & Nannan Lundin, 2013. "Foreign Firms and Indigenous Technology Development in the People's Republic of China," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 30(2), pages 49-75, September.
    19. Zhang, Chuanguo & Zhou, Xiangxue, 2016. "Does foreign direct investment lead to lower CO2 emissions? Evidence from a regional analysis in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 943-951.
    20. Hübler, Michael, 2015. "Labor mobility and technology diffusion: A new concept and its application to rural Southeast Asia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 137-151.
    21. Jin, Shaosheng & Guo, Haiyue & Delgado, Michael & Wang, H., 2015. "Benefit or Damage? The Productivity Effects of FDI in Chinese Food Industry," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211813, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    22. Jin, Shaosheng & Guo, Haiyue & Delgado, Michael S. & Wang, H. Holly, 2017. "Benefit or damage? The productivity effects of FDI in the Chinese food industry," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 1-9.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign direct investment; Spillover effects; China;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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