IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Herding behaviour in the Chinese and Indian stock markets

  • Lao, Paulo
  • Singh, Harminder
Registered author(s):

    The existence of herding behaviour challenges the validity of the “efficient market hypothesis”. This study examines herding behaviour in the Chinese and Indian stock markets; our findings suggest that herding behaviour exists in both. The level of herding depends on market conditions. In the Chinese market, herding behaviour is greater when the market is falling and the trading volume is high. On the other hand, in India the study finds that it occurs during up-swings in market conditions. Herding behaviour is more prevalent during large market movements in both markets. In relative terms, a lower prevalence of herding behaviour was detected in the Indian stock market.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Asian Economics.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 6 ()
    Pages: 495-506

    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:22:y:2011:i:6:p:495-506
    DOI: 10.1016/j.asieco.2011.08.001
    Contact details of provider: Web page:

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Chiang, Thomas C. & Li, Jiandong & Tan, Lin, 2010. "Empirical investigation of herding behavior in Chinese stock markets: Evidence from quantile regression analysis," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 111-124.
    2. Keim, Donald B., 1999. "An analysis of mutual fund design: the case of investing in small-cap stocks," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 173-194, February.
    3. Tan, Lin & Chiang, Thomas C. & Mason, Joseph R. & Nelling, Edward, 2008. "Herding behavior in Chinese stock markets: An examination of A and B shares," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 16(1-2), pages 61-77, January.
    4. McQueen, Grant & Pinegar, Michael & Thorley, Steven, 1996. " Delayed Reaction to Good News and the Cross-Autocorrelation of Portfolio Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(3), pages 889-919, July.
    5. Chen, Gong-meng & Firth, Michael & Rui, Oliver M, 2001. "The Dynamic Relation between Stock Returns, Trading Volume, and Volatility," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 36(3), pages 153-73, August.
    6. Guoping Li, 2008. "China's Stock Market: Inefficiencies and Institutional Implications," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 16(6), pages 81-96.
    7. Fama, Eugene F, 1970. "Efficient Capital Markets: A Review of Theory and Empirical Work," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 25(2), pages 383-417, May.
    8. Tversky, Amos & Kahneman, Daniel, 1986. "Rational Choice and the Framing of Decisions," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(4), pages S251-78, October.
    9. John R. Nofsinger & Richard W. Sias, 1999. "Herding and Feedback Trading by Institutional and Individual Investors," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(6), pages 2263-2295, December.
    10. Shujie Yao & Dan Luo, 2009. "The Economic Psychology of Stock Market Bubbles in China," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(5), pages 667-691, 05.
    11. Devenow, Andrea & Welch, Ivo, 1996. "Rational herding in financial economics," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 603-615, April.
    12. Tarun Khanna & Krishna Palepu, 2000. "Is Group Affiliation Profitable in Emerging Markets? An Analysis of Diversified Indian Business Groups," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 867-891, 04.
    13. Sunil Sharma & Sushil Bikhchandani, 2000. "Herd Behavior in Financial Markets; A Review," IMF Working Papers 00/48, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Demirer, RIza & Kutan, Ali M., 2006. "Does herding behavior exist in Chinese stock markets?," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 123-142, April.
    15. Hott, Christian, 2009. "Herding behavior in asset markets," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 35-56, January.
    16. Yoshio Iihara & Hideaki Kiyoshi Kato & Toshifumi Tokunaga, 2001. "Investors' Herding on the Tokyo Stock Exchange," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 2(1&2), pages 71-98.
    17. Scharfstein, David S & Stein, Jeremy C, 1990. "Herd Behavior and Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 465-79, June.
    18. Chang, Eric C. & Cheng, Joseph W. & Khorana, Ajay, 2000. "An examination of herd behavior in equity markets: An international perspective," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(10), pages 1651-1679, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:22:y:2011:i:6:p:495-506. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamier, Wendy)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.