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The residential demand for electricity in Japan: An examination using empirical panel analysis techniques

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  • Nakajima, Tadahiro

Abstract

This paper examines the residential demand for electricity in Japan, excluding Okinawa-prefecture, from 1975 to 2005 as a function of the disposable income per household and the overall unit price of electricity for general consumers, by using the empirical panel analysis techniques of a panel unit root test, a panel cointegration test, and group-mean dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) estimators to determine whether or not each variable is stationary. This study's contribution is twofold. First, for a more accurate empirical economic analysis, it divides Japan into a number of regions so that the estimation of coefficients becomes more powerful due to the increased degree of freedom from the utilization of the panel data. Second, the study chose Japan for this analysis on the basis of discussions regarding the deregulation of the residential electric power supply that is scheduled for the near future. All variables--sales per household, price, and income per household--can be assumed to have a unit root and cointegration relationship. The results determine that the price effect is negative and elastic and that the income effect is inelastic. These results correspond to other such studies on developed countries that are significant economic powers.

Suggested Citation

  • Nakajima, Tadahiro, 2010. "The residential demand for electricity in Japan: An examination using empirical panel analysis techniques," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 412-420, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:21:y:2010:i:4:p:412-420
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hung, Ming-Feng & Huang, Tai-Hsin, 2015. "Dynamic demand for residential electricity in Taiwan under seasonality and increasing-block pricing," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 168-177.
    2. Nakajima, Tadahiro, 2013. "Inefficient and opaque price formation in the Japan Electric Power Exchange," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 329-334.
    3. Adom, Philip Kofi, 2017. "The long-run price sensitivity dynamics of industrial and residential electricity demand: The impact of deregulating electricity prices," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 43-60.
    4. Bernstein, Ronald & Madlener, Reinhard, 2011. "Responsiveness of Residential Electricity Demand in OECD Countries: A Panel Cointegation and Causality Analysis," FCN Working Papers 8/2011, E.ON Energy Research Center, Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN).
    5. Kiran B Krishnamurthy, Chandra & Kriström, Bengt, 2013. "A cross-country analysis of residential electricity demand in 11 OECD-countries," CERE Working Papers 2013:5, CERE - the Center for Environmental and Resource Economics, revised 30 Jun 2014.
    6. Pourazarm, Elham & Cooray, Arusha, 2013. "Estimating and forecasting residential electricity demand in Iran," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 546-558.
    7. Fukushige, Mototsugu & Yamawaki, Hiroshige, 2015. "The relationship between an electricity supply ceiling and economic growth: An application of disequilibrium modeling to Taiwan," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 14-23.
    8. Okajima, Shigeharu & Okajima, Hiroko, 2013. "Estimation of Japanese price elasticities of residential electricity demand, 1990–2007," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 433-440.
    9. Lee Lian Ivy-Yap & Hussain Ali Bekhet, 2015. "Examining the Feedback Response of Residential Electricity Consumption towards Changes in its Determinants: Evidence from Malaysia," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(3), pages 772-781.
    10. Desiderio Romero-Jordán & Pablo del Río & Cristina Peñasco, 2014. "Household electricity demand in Spanish regions. Public policy implications," Working Papers 2014/24, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    11. Lee Lian Ivy-Yap & Hussain Ali Bekhet, 2016. "Modelling the causal linkages among residential electricity consumption, gross domestic product, price of electricity, price of electric appliances, population and foreign direct investment in Malaysi," International Journal of Energy Technology and Policy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 12(1), pages 41-59.
    12. Krishnamurthy, Chandra Kiran B. & Kriström, Bengt, 2015. "A cross-country analysis of residential electricity demand in 11 OECD-countries," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 68-88.
    13. Adom, Philip Kofi, 2016. "Electricity Supply and System losses in Ghana. What is the red line? Have we crossed over?," MPRA Paper 74559, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Nov 2016.

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