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Intensification of Sahelian farming systems: evidence from Niger


  • Abdoulaye, T.
  • Lowenberg-DeBoer, J.


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  • Abdoulaye, T. & Lowenberg-DeBoer, J., 2000. "Intensification of Sahelian farming systems: evidence from Niger," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 67-81, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:64:y:2000:i:2:p:67-81

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ramaswamy, Sunder & Sanders, John H., 1992. "Population pressure, land degradation and sustainable agricultural technologies in the Sahel," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 361-378.
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    Cited by:

    1. Drafor, Ivy & Kunze, Dagmar & Sarpong, Daniel Bruce, 2013. "Food Security: How Rural Ghanaian Households Respond to Food Shortages in Lean Season," International Journal of Agricultural Management, Institute of Agricultural Management;International Farm Management Association, vol. 2(4), July.
    2. de Rouw, Anneke, 2004. "Improving yields and reducing risks in pearl millet farming in the African Sahel," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 73-93, July.
    3. Abdoulaye, Tahirou & Sanders, John H., 2006. "New technologies, marketing strategies and public policy for traditional food crops: Millet in Niger," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 90(1-3), pages 272-292, October.
    4. Tahirou Abdoulaye & John H. Sanders, 2005. "Stages and determinants of fertilizer use in semiarid African agriculture: the Niger experience," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(2), pages 167-179, March.
    5. Cornia, Giovanni Andrea & Deotti, Laura & Sassi, Maria, 2016. "Sources of food price volatility and child malnutrition in Niger and Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 20-30.
    6. Rovere, Roberto La & Keulen van, Herman & Hiernaux, Pierre & Szonyi, Judit & A. Schipper, Robert, 2008. "Intensification scenarios in south-western Niger: Implications for revisiting fertilizer policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 156-164, April.
    7. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Laura Deotti & Maria Sassi, 2012. "Food Price Volatility over the Last Decade in Niger and Malawi: Extent, Sources and Impact on Child Malnutrition," Working Papers - Economics wp2012_04.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    8. Kelly, Valerie A., 2005. "Farmers' Demand for Fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa," Staff Papers 11612, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Pender, John L. & Abdoulaye, Tahirou & Ndjeunga, Jupiter & Gerard, Bruno & Edward, Kato, 2006. "Impacts of Inventory Credit, Input Supply Shops and Fertilizer Micro-Dosing in the Drylands of Niger," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25643, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Tahirou Abdoulaye & John Sanders, 2005. "New Technologies, Marketing Strategies and Public Policy for Traditional Food Crops: Millet in Niger," Working Papers 05-07, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    11. Place, Frank & Barrett, Christopher B. & Freeman, H. Ade & Ramisch, Joshua J. & Vanlauwe, Bernard, 2003. "Prospects for integrated soil fertility management using organic and inorganic inputs: evidence from smallholder African agricultural systems," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 365-378, August.

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