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Corruption, aid volatility & growth


  • Jay Kathavate

    () (University of Western Sydney)


This paper revisits the debate on foreign aid effectiveness from a different perspective by analysing the role of institutional corruption on the effect of aid volatility on the output of developing nations. A simple political economy model is developed to show the effect of corruption on rent-seeking activities of incumbent legislators and their subsequent effect on country output. This phenomenon is empirically tested using data on 77 aid-receiving countries from the span of 1984 to 2007 using GMM to control for potential endogeneity.

Suggested Citation

  • Jay Kathavate, 2013. "Corruption, aid volatility & growth," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1159-1169.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-13-00226

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Robert Lensink & Oliver Morrissey, 2000. "Aid instability as a measure of uncertainty and the positive impact of aid on growth," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(3), pages 31-49.
    2. Robert Lensink & Oliver Morrissey, 2006. "Foreign Direct Investment: Flows, Volatility, and the Impact on Growth," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(3), pages 478-493, August.
    3. Fielding, David & Mavrotas, George, 2005. "The Volatility of Aid," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2005/06, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Hudson, John & Mosley, Paul, 2008. "Aid Volatility, Policy and Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 2082-2102, October.
    5. Michael A. Clemens & Steven Radelet & Rikhil Bhavnani, 2004. "Counting chickens when they hatch: The short-term effect of aid on growth," International Finance 0407010, EconWPA.
    6. Arellano, Cristina & BulĂ­r, Ales & Lane, Timothy & Lipschitz, Leslie, 2009. "The dynamic implications of foreign aid and its variability," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 87-102, January.
    7. Ale Bulir & A. Javier Hamann, 2003. "Aid Volatility: An Empirical Assessment," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 50(1), pages 1-4.
    8. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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    More about this item


    Aid Volatility; Corruption; Political Economy; Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity


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