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Good news for experimenters: Subjects are hard to influence by instructorsʹ cues

Author

Listed:
  • Ivo Bischoff

    () (University of Kassel)

  • Björn Frank

    () (University of Kassel)

Abstract

An important concern of experimenters is that instructorsʹ nonverbal cues might change subject behavior. We let a professional actor try to produce this bias on purpose, finding only weak evidence for an "instructor demand effect", and only for female subjects.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivo Bischoff & Björn Frank, 2011. "Good news for experimenters: Subjects are hard to influence by instructorsʹ cues," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(4), pages 3221-3225.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00779
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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2011/Volume31/EB-11-V31-I4-P291.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Glenn W. Harrison & John A. List, 2004. "Field Experiments," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1009-1055, December.
    2. Daniel Zizzo, 2010. "Experimenter demand effects in economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 13(1), pages 75-98, March.
    3. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-474, June.
    4. Selten, Reinhard & Ockenfels, Axel, 1998. "An experimental solidarity game," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 517-539, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bischoff, Ivo & Krauskopf, Thomas, 2015. "Warm glow of giving collectively – An experimental study," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 210-218.
    2. Ivo Bischoff & Özcan Ihtiyar, 2015. "Feedback and Emotions in the Trust Game," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201503, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    3. Korbinian von Blanckenburg & Milena Neubert, 2014. "Monopoly Profit Maximization: Success and Economic Principles," Working Papers 1406, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, revised 25 Nov 2014.
    4. Piers Fleming & Daniel Zizzo, 2015. "A simple stress test of experimenter demand effects," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 78(2), pages 219-231, February.
    5. Ivo Bischoff & Thomas Krauskopf, 2013. "Motives of pro-social behavior in individual versus collective decisions – a comparative experimental study," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201319, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic experiments; Methodology; Experimenter demand effects; Priming;

    JEL classification:

    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments
    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology

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