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An Alternative Nonlinear Perspective on the Consumption, Income and Wealth Relationship

  • Mark J. Holmes

    ()

    (University of Waikato)

  • Xin Shen

    ()

    (University of Waikato)

We provide new evidence on the relationship between consumption expenditure and key drivers namely, income and wealth. Using a testing procedure advocated by Bierens applied to US data, we find evidence that all series are in fact stationary around a nonlinear deterministic trend and are co-trended insofar as they share a common nonlinear deterministic trend. This can be seen in the context of cointegration-based studies that have often found against the existence of a long-run relationship. We also contribute to the ‘great ratios' debate concerning the time series properties of the average propensity to consume.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2012/Volume32/EB-12-V32-I1-P71.pdf
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Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 32 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 766-777

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Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00699
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  1. Bierens, H.J., 1995. "Nonparametric cointegration analysis," Discussion Paper 1995-123, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  2. Gregory, A.W. & Hansen, B.E., 1992. "Residual-Based Tests for Cointegration in Models with Regime Shifts," RCER Working Papers 335, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  3. Christopher D. Carroll & Misuzu Otsuka & Jirka Slacalek, 2006. "How Large Is the Housing Wealth Effect? A New Approach," NBER Working Papers 12746, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Bierens, Herman J., 1997. "Testing the unit root with drift hypothesis against nonlinear trend stationarity, with an application to the US price level and interest rate," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 29-64, November.
  5. Perron, P., 1994. "Further Evidence on Breaking Trend Functions in Macroeconomic Variables," Cahiers de recherche 9421, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  6. Pierre Perron & Tomoyoshi Yabu, 2005. "Testing for Shifts in Trend with an Integrated or Stationary Noise Component," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2005-026, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  7. Camarero, Mariam & Ordonez, Javier, 2006. "Is there a nonlinear co-movement in the EU countries' unemployment?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 157-162, November.
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