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Welfare Effects of Access to Water Service in Cambodia

Author

Listed:
  • Theara Horn

    () (Osaka University)

Abstract

From data collected by questionnaire survey of three communes in the Kandal province of Cambodia, where public water supply remains inaccessible, this study estimates the demand function for drinking water and finds that the price elasticity is between -0.26 and -0.29. Based on this, and given the price set by the Phnom Penh Water Supply Authority, expansion of service would increase per capita water consumption by 9.8 liters per day, increase consumer surplus by 4.6 percent of total expenditure and decrease the number of households surviving on less than 30 liters of water per day by 5.3 percent. A simulation is used to calculate the water price such that the benefit of water connection exceeds the cost.

Suggested Citation

  • Theara Horn, 2011. "Welfare Effects of Access to Water Service in Cambodia," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2075-2089.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-10-00734
    as

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2011/Volume31/EB-11-V31-I3-P187.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mike Garn & Jonathan Isham & Satu Kahkonen, 2002. "Should we Bet on Private or Public Water Utilities in Cambodia? Evidence on Incentives and Performace from Seven Provincial Towns," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0219, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    2. Nauges, Céline & Strand, Jon & Walker, Ian, 2009. "The value of water connections in Central American cities: a revealed preference study," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(03), pages 349-370, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Vlach, Tomas, 2016. "Publication Bias in Measuring the Income Elasticity of Water Demand," MPRA Paper 75247, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. repec:uwp:landec:v:94:y:2018:i:2:p:259-283 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Tomas Vlach, 2017. "Measuring the Income Elasticity of Water Demand: The Importance of Publication and Endogeneity Biases," Working Papers IES 2017/02, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Feb 2017.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cambodia; Water Demand; Welfare; Water Tariff;

    JEL classification:

    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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