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Traditional public schools versus charter schools: a comparison of technical efficiency

  • Todd Nesbit


    (Penn State Erie, The Behrend College)

  • Joseph Palardy


    (Youngstown State University)

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    This paper addresses the now famous question of “Does Money Matter?” in public education. While the general consensus is that additional expenditures may improve educational outcomes, this is by no means a guarantee. Indeed, some studies indicate that a school's resources are not an important determinant of student performance. As Adkins and Moomaw (2003) suggest, the true relationship between resources and performance may become more apparent in a better specified model accounting for technical inefficiency. Along these lines, we attempt to measure the technical efficiency gains of charter schools over traditional public schools using a stochastic frontier production model.

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    Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): 9 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 9 ()
    Pages: 1-10

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    Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07i20003
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    1. Caroline Minter Hoxby, 2003. "Introduction to "The Economics of School Choice"," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of School Choice, pages 1-22 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Adkins, Lee C. & Moomaw, Ronald L., 2003. "The impact of local funding on the technical efficiency of Oklahoma schools," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 31-37, October.
    3. George M. Holmes, . "Does school choice increase school quality?," Working Papers 0106, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
    4. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2003. "The Economics of School Choice," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number hox03-1, July.
    5. Meeusen, Wim & van den Broeck, Julien, 1977. "Efficiency Estimation from Cobb-Douglas Production Functions with Composed Error," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 18(2), pages 435-44, June.
    6. Aigner, Dennis & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1977. "Formulation and estimation of stochastic frontier production function models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-37, July.
    7. Hanushek, Eric A, 1986. "The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1141-77, September.
    8. Battese, G E & Coelli, T J, 1995. "A Model for Technical Inefficiency Effects in a Stochastic Frontier Production Function for Panel Data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 325-32.
    9. John Ruggiero & Donald F. Vitaliano, 1999. "Assessing The Efficiency Of Public Schools Using Data Envelopment Analysis And Frontier Regression," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 17(3), pages 321-331, 07.
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