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Household shocks and child labor in rural Malawi

  • Seife Dendir

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Radford University)

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    This paper investigates the impact of household shocks on the incidence and intensity of child labor in rural Malawi. Intensity is measured as the reported number of sessions that a child was working. Probit and zero-inflated negative binomial estimates fail to provide evidence in support of the hypothesis that child labor increases in response to the occurrence of shocks.

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2007/Volume4/EB-07D10002A.pdf
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    Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): 4 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 1-8

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    Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07d10002
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    1. Jean-Philippe Platteau, 1997. "Mutual insurance as an elusive concept in traditional rural communities," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(6), pages 764-796.
    2. Robert Jensen, 2000. "Agricultural Volatility and Investments in Children," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 399-404, May.
    3. Fafchamps, Marcel & Lund, Susan, 2003. "Risk-sharing networks in rural Philippines," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 261-287, August.
    4. Cochrane, John H, 1991. "A Simple Test of Consumption Insurance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(5), pages 957-76, October.
    5. L.Guarcello & F.Mealli & F.Rosati, 2002. "Household Vulnerability and Child Labour: the Effect of Shocks, Credit Rationing and Insurance," UCW Working Paper 3, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
    6. Vuong, Quang H, 1989. "Likelihood Ratio Tests for Model Selection and Non-nested Hypotheses," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 307-33, March.
    7. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Gatti, Roberta, 2006. "Child labor and agricultural shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 80-96, October.
    8. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-27, June.
    9. Jacoby, Hanan G & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 1997. "Risk, Financial Markets, and Human Capital in a Developing Country," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(3), pages 311-35, July.
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