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Foreign direct investment and profit outflows: a causality analysis for the Brazilian economy

Author

Listed:
  • Fernando Seabra

    () (Federal University of Santa Catarina)

  • Lisandra Flach

    () (Universität Stuttgart)

Abstract

Most empirical works have focused on the effects of foreign direct investment (FDI) to exports and other economic performance indicators, whereas its impacts to profit outflows has been relatively neglected. This paper investigates the nature of the causal relationship between FDI and profit remittance in Brazil using the Granger causality test procedure developed by Toda and Yamamoto (1995). The findings in this paper indicate that FDI causes profit remittance and emphasize significant adverse long-run effects of FDI attraction policies for the Brazilian economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando Seabra & Lisandra Flach, 2005. "Foreign direct investment and profit outflows: a causality analysis for the Brazilian economy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 6(1), pages 1-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04f30012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Jansen, Karel, 1995. "The macroeconomic effects of direct foreign investment: The case of Thailand," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 193-210, February.
    5. Ihrig, Jane, 2000. "Multinationals' response to repatriation restrictions," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(9), pages 1345-1379, August.
    6. Manuel Agosin & Roberto Machado, 2005. "Foreign Investment in Developing Countries: Does it Crowd in Domestic Investment?," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 149-162.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Srđan Boljanović, 2012. "A Sustainability Analysis Of Serbia’S Current Account Deficit," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 57(195), pages 139-172, October -.
    2. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Mutascu, Mihai & Tiwari, Aviral Kumar, 2012. "Revisiting the Relationship between Electricity Consumption, Capital and Economic Growth: Cointegration and Causality Analysis in Romania," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(3), pages 97-120, September.
    3. Osman Suliman, 2008. "Do Capital Inflows Cause Currency Black Markets in MENA? Causality Tests for Heterogeneous Panels," Working Papers 381, Economic Research Forum, revised 01 Jan 2008.
    4. Dierk Herzer & Stephan Klasen & Felicitas Nowak-Lehmann D., 2006. "In search of FDI-led growth in developing countries," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 150, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    5. SULIMAN, Osman, 2013. "Do Capital Inflows Cause Currency Black Markets In Mena Countries? Causality Tests For Heterogeneous Panels," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 13(1), pages 187-202.
    6. A. Yasemin Yalta, 2012. "Uncovering the channels through which FDI affects current account: the case of Turkey," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 158-167.
    7. Nathalia Rios Ballesteros & Thomas Goda, 2017. "Natural resource-seeking FDI inflows and current account deficits in commodity-producing developing economies," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 015298, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
    8. Dube, Smile, 2009. "Foreign Direct Investment and Electricity Consumption on Economic Growth: Evidence from South Africa," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 62(2), pages 175-200.
    9. Herzer, Dierk & Klasen, Stephan & Nowak-Lehmann D., Felicitas, 2008. "In search of FDI-led growth in developing countries: The way forward," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 793-810, September.
    10. Jaydeep Mukherjee & Debashis Chakraborty & Tanaya Sinha, 2013. "How has FDI influenced Current Account Balance In India? Time Series Results in presence of Endogenous Structural Breaks," Working Papers 1317, Indian Institute of Foreign Trade.
    11. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Huang, Wei-Ling & Yin, Chun-Hao, 2013. "The dynamic interactions among the stock, bond and insurance markets," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 28-52.
    12. B. Bayraktar-Saglam & A.Y. Yalta, 2015. "Current Account Imbalances and Capital Flows," Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies, Emerging Markets Forum, vol. 7(2), pages 201-213, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business

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